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SIMMONS COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 



The Gift of 



TO 

MARY ESTHER ROBBINS 

IN 

SINCERE AND LOVING APPRECIATION 

OF 

HER WORK FOR THE COLLEGE AND FOR THE 

STUDENTS 

THE CLASS OF 1913 

DEDICATES THIS BOOK 



tlRhe Jftltcrocosim 




&be g>immong College Annual 

PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS 
OF SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BOSTON : : : : MASSACHUSETTS 







■ , • ',! 



> , 



VOLUME FOUR 



Simmons College 
Boston, Massachusetts 

1913 



jforetoorb 



M^^-^HE Microcosm Board takes great pleasure in 

^ J acknowledging here their sincere thanks to all 

those who have helped "make' 1 the 1913 

Microcosm in any way, and especially to the following: 

Dr. Stiles, Josephine Pippey, Alice Ray, Lillian Nisbet, 
Sally Russell, Jessie Ludgate, Dorothy Inglis, Mia Rosen- 
blad, Mary Tulis. 

• •• • • ••• • • • • •• •••••••••«• 

••• ••*••••••••• ••• ••• *.••• • •«• . • . • •»;••• 

Miss Robbins, M;ss.£oQp4r J .D.r. Farley, Marie Gurdy, 
Marion Donaldson, **Mv Rose, 'I/irke Peck, Ruth Whiting, 
Marion Ostrander, Hilda Combe. 










PAGE 

Athletics 113 

Calendar, 1912-1913 9 

Classes: 

1913 34 

1914 66 

1915 72 

1916 80 

College Graduates and Institu- 
tional Management Class 88 

Unclassified Students 94 

Class Song, 1913 32 

College Organizations: 

The Student Guild 99 

The Student Government Asso — 101 

Y. W. C. A 103 

Glee Club 109 



PAGE 

Mandolin Club Ill 

Simmons Musical Association 112 

Corporation 10 

Faculty 11 

Good-By 63 

Great Oaks 64 

Instructors 21 

MlCROCHAOS 128 

Microcosm, 1913 107 

Our Work 31 

Prize Babies 166 

Senior Play 124 

Simmons College Athletic Asso. ... 105 

Basket Ball 117 

Tennis 115 

Track Events 120 

Students' Room 122 



53680 




1912-13 



1912 






September 


9-14 




September 


16, 17 




September 


16-18 




September 


18 




October 


12 




November 


28-30 




December 


19 




1913 






January 


2 




February 


1 




February 


3 




February 


22 




March 


20 




April 


1 




April 


19 




May 


30 




May 26-June 6 




June 


11 




June 


16-21 




July 


8-August 


16 



Entrance examinations 
Registration 
Condition examinations 
Opening of the College Year 
Columbus Day, a holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
College closes at noon 
Christmas Vacation 



College opens at 9 a.m. 

End of the first term 

Opening of the second term 

Washington's Birthday, a holiday 

College closes at noon 

Spring Vacation 

College opens at 9 a.m. 

Patriots' Day, a holiday 

Memorial Day, a holiday 

Final Examinations 

Commencement Day 

College Entrance Board Examinations. 

The summer classes 




HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Boston, President 

ROBERT TREAT PAINE, 2d, A.B., Boston, Treasurer 

JOHN WASHBURN BARTOL, A.B., M.D., Boston, Clerk 

FRANCES BAKER AMES, Boston 

FRANCES ROLLINS MORSE, Boston 

WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.D., Sc.D, Brookline 

JOSEPH BANGS WARNER, A.M., LL.B., Boston 

MARY MORTON KEHEW, Boston 

HORATIO APPLETON LAMB, A.B., Milton 

GEORGE HENRY ELLIS, West Newton 

MARION McGREGOR NOYES, A.M., Winchester 

GUY LOWELL, A.B., S.B, Brookline 

MARY ELEANOR WILLIAMS, Brookline 

EDWARD DESHON BRANDEGEE, A.B., Brookline 






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HENRY LEFAVOUR, Ph.D., LL.D., Presi- 
dent. A.B., Williams College, 1883; 
Ph.D., Williams College, 1886; LL.D., 
Williams College, 1902; Tufts College, 
1905. 

Additional course, University of Berlin. 

Instructor in Williston Seminary; Professor and Dean of 
V\ illiams College; President of Simmons College from 1902. 

Phi Beta Kappa, Trustee Williams College, Trustee Boston 
State Hospital, President Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 
Fellow American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Trustee 
Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities,, 
Fellow American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
New England Historic Genealogical Society, American 
Economic Association, American Sociological Association; 
Director Hale House Association, Executive Committee 
North Bennet Street Industrial School; St. Botolph Club,. 
Boston City Club, City Club of New York. 




SARAH LOUISE ARNOLD, Dean, and Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of 
Education. A.M., Tufts. 

Formerly Principal of Schools, St. Johnsbury, Vt.; Princi- 
pal of Training School for Teachers, Saratoga, N. Y.; Super- 
visor of Primary Schools, Minneapolis, Minn.; Supervisor of 
Schools, Boston, Mass.; Dean of Simmons College from 1902. 

Publications: Waymarks for Teachers; Reading, How to- 
Teach It; Stepping Stones to Literature, Series (with C. D.. 
Gilbert); The Mother Tongue, Series (with George L. Kit- 
tredge); With Pencil and Pen; General \Articles on Education, 

Member of the Mayflower Club; the Social Education 
Club; the Executive Committee of Women's Education. 
Association, Boston; of Board of Trustees, Women's Educa- 
tional and Industrial Union; National Council of Education; 
Massachusetts State Board of Education; President of 
American Association of Home Economics. 



12 



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JAMES FLACK NORRIS, Professor of 
Chemistry. A.B., Ph.D., Johns Hop- 
kins University. 

Assistant Professor of Organic Chemistry, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology, 1900-1904; Work at the Technische 
Hochschule Karlsruhe, 1910-1911; Lecturer on Organic 
Chemistry, Harvard University, 1912-1913. 

Publications: Author of The Principles of Organic 
Chemistry, and about thirty papers on Inorganic and Organic 
Chemistry, published in American and German Chemical 
Journals. 

Phi Beta Kappa, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 
American Chemical Society, Die Deutsche Chemische Gesell- 
schaft, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
Chemistry Teachers' Association of New England, Examiner 
in Chemistry of College Entrance Examination Board, 
American Home Economics Association, Technology Club. 

FRANK EDGAR FARLEY, Professor of 
English. A.B., Harvard, 1893; A.M., 
Harvard, 1894; Ph.D., Harvard, 1897. 

Assistant in English, Harvard University; Assistant in 
English, Radcliffe College; Instructor in English, Haverford 
College; Professor of English, Syracuse University. 

Publications: Author of Scandinavian Influences in the 
English Romantic Movement, 1903. Editor of Milton's Para- 
dise Lost, 1898. 





*ALFRED BULL NICHOLS, A.B., Pro- 
fessor of German. A.B., Yale Univer- 
sity, 1880. 



*On leave of absence. 




13 






JEFFREY R. BRACKETT, A.B., Ph.D., 

Associate Professor of the Theory and 
Practice of Philanthropic Work, and 
Director of the School for Social Workers. 
A.B., Harvard University, 1883; Ph.D., 
Johns Hopkins University, 1889. 

President Department Charities of Baltimore, Maryland; 
President National Conference of Charities and Correction; 
Director of School for Social Workers, Boston, from 1904. 

Author of Supervision and Education in Charity, 1901. 

Massachusetts State Board of Charitv. 



REGINALD RUSDEN GOODELL, A.B., 
A.M., Associate Professor of Romance 
Languages. Bowdoin College. 

Additional courses, Johns Hopkins University, The Sor- 
bonne, LAlliance Francaise. 

Instructor at Bowdoin College; Instructor at M. I. T.; 
Associate Professor from 1902. 

Editor of L' Enfant Espion and Other Stories. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi, Technology Club, 
Modern Language Association, Salon Francais de Boston. 



EDWARD HENRY ELDRIDGE, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Secretarial Studies. 
Temple University, A.M., 1903; Tem- 
ple University, Ph.D., 1907. 

Special wcrk in Psychology at University of Chicago, 
University of Pennsylvania, Clark University. Two years at 
Amherst College. 

Stenographer in a business house; Secretary to President 
Gates at Amherst College; Secretary to President Conwell, of 
Temple University; Professor of Psychology at Temple Uni- 
versity; Director of School of Business at Temple University. 

Publications: Hypnotism, Penn Publishing Company, 
1910; Shorthand Dictation Exercises, American Book Com- 
pany, 1909; Expert Typewriting, co-author with Miss Rose L. 
Fritz, American Book Company, 1912. 

Delta Upsilon, Vice-President, Alumni Association of 
Temple University; President of the Eastern Commercial 
Teachers' Association; Secretary of National Shorthand 
Reporters' Association. 



14 









CHARLES KNOWLES BOLTON, Associate 
Professor of Library Science. A.B., Har- 
vard College. 

Librarian Boston Athenseum. 

Publications: Saskia, the Wife of Rembrandt, The Private 
Soldier under Washington, Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and 
America, Two Chapters in A, L. A. Manual of Library Science. 
Editor Letters of Hugh Earl Percy and of the Athenaeum Cen- 
tenary. 

Phi Beta Kappa (honorary) at Harvard; President, Society 
for the Preservation of New England Antiquities; Treasurer, 
New England Historical Genealogical Society; Chairman, 
Visiting Committee to Library Museum of Fine Arts; Mem- 
ber, Visiting Committee to Library Harvard University; 
Trustee of Donations for Education in Liberia; Member, 
Massachusetts Historical Society, etc. 




SUSAN MYRA KINGSBURY, Associate 
Professor of Economics. A.B., Univer- 
sity of the Pacific; A.M., Leland Stan- 
ford Junior University; Ph.D., Colum- 
bia University. 

Teacher of History in the San Francisco Lowell High 
School, Instructor in History at Vassar College, Supervisor 
of Investigation under the Massachusetts Commission on 
Industrial and Technical Education. 

Publications: Records of the Virginia Company; report on 
The Relation of Children to the Industries. 

Kappa Alpha Theta Fraternity, American Historical 
Association, New England History Teachers' Association. 




MARY ESTHER ROBBINS, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Library Science and Librarian. 

Graduate New York State Library School. 

Librarian, New Britain Institute, New Britain, Conn.; 
Head Cataloguer, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb.; 
Organizer of various libraries East and West for five years; 
Instructor in Charge, Summer Library School, Chautauqua, 
N. Y.; Simmons College from 1902. 

Publications: Articles in professional journals. 

Member of the Council, American Library Association; 
Fellow American Library Institute; Bibliographical Society 
of America, Massachusetts Library Club. 




15 




MARIA MILLETT HOWARD, Assistant 

Professor of Household Economics. 

Principal of Boston Cooking School, Lecturer on Home 
Economics. 




KENNETH L. MARK, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. Har- 
vard University, A.B., 1898; A.M., 
1900; Ph.D., 1903. 

Assistant in Chemistry, Harvard University; Instructor 
in Chemistry, Simmons College; Assistant Professor from 1906. 
Author of Them a] Expansion of Gases. 
Delta Lpsilon, American Chemical Society. 




LESLIE LYLE CAMPBELL, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Physics. M.A., Ph.D., Wash- 
ington and Lee University; A.M., Har- 
vard University. 

Assistant in Mathematics, Washington and Lee University; 
Assistant in Physics, Harvard; Professor in Physics, Westmin- 
ster. 

Publications: Thomson Effect, Hall Effect, Nernst Effect, 
Ledue Effect, Ettingshausen Effect in Soft Iron, Thermo-Electric 
Heterogeneity in Alloys. 

Fellow American Association for Advancement of Science, 
Member American Physical Society, Member Eastern Asso- 
ciation of Physics Teachers, Member Mathematical and 
Physical Club, Member National Geographical Society; 
Member Congo Reform Association, Member Phi Beta Kappa. 



16 



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PERCY GOLDTHWAIT STILES, Assist- 
ant Professor of Physiology since 1907. 
S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, 1897; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity, 1902. 

Post-graduate student at Johns Hopkins, 1899-1902. 

Instructor, Bellevue Medical College, 1902-1903; In- 
structor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1903; In- 
structor, Simmons College, 1904-1907. 

Publications: Nutritional Physiology, Saunders, 1912; 
sundry scientific papers and reviews. 

American Physiological Society, Society for Experimental 
Biology and Medicine. 




ERNST HERMANN PAUL GROSS- 
MANN, A.B., Assistant Professor of 
German. Berlin Normal College; A.B., 
Harvard University, 1902. 

Instructor at Harvard University; Instructor, Simmons 
College, 1904-1908; Assistant Professor, Simmons College, 
from 1908. 

Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft, Deutscher Sprachverein. 




CHARLES MARSHALL UNDERWOOD, 
Jr., A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages. Harvard 
University, 1900; A.M., Harvard Uni- 
versity, 1901; Ph.D., Harvard Univer- 
sity, 1905. 

Additional courses, University of Paris, University of 
Grenoble. 

Instructor, Harvard University; Dartmouth College; Uni- 
versity of Cincinnati; Instructor, Simmons College, 1907-1908; 
Assistant Professor, Simmons College from 1908. 




17 



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FREDERIC AUSTIN OGG, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History. Ph.B., De Pauw Uni- 
versity, 1899; A.M., University of In- 
diana, 1900; A.M., Harvard University, 
1904; Ph.D., Harvard University, 1908. 

Instructor in History, University of Indiana, 1902-1903)' 
Fellow and Assistant in History, Harvard University, 1904" 
1907; Instructor in History, Simmons College, 1905-1909! 
Assistant Professor of History, Simmons College, 1909-1911. 

Publications: The Opening of the Mississippi (New York, 
Macmillan, 1904); Source Book of Medieval History (New 
York, American Book Co., 1908); Edited Fordham's Narrative 
of a Journey through the West, 1817-1818 (Cleveland, Clark, 
1906). Social Progress in Contemporary Europe (New York, 
1912); The Governments of Europe (New York, 1913). 

Beta Theta Pi, Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical 
Association, American Economic Association, American 
Political Science Association, American Geographic Society, 
Political Science Association of the City of New York. 

JAMES HOLLY HANFORD, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of English. A.B., University of 
Rochester, 1904; A.M., Harvard, 1907; 
Ph.D., Harvard, 1909. 

Teacher of English, East High School, Rochester, N. Y., 
1904-1906; Instructor in English, Harvard, 1911-1913. 

Publications: The Pastoral Elegy and Milton's Lycidas, 
in publications of the Modern Language Association of 
America, xxv, 3; Classical Eclogue and Medieval Debate, in 
the Romanic Review, ii, 1 and 3; Suicide in the Plays of Shake- 
speare, in publications of the Modern Language Association 
of America, xxvii, 3. 

Psi Upsilon, Modern Language Association of America. 

ALICE FRANCES BLOOD, Ph.D., Assist- 
ant Professor in Chemistry. S.B., Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, 1903; 
Ph.D., Yale University, 1910. 

Private Assistant to Dr. S. P. Mullihen, 1903-1904; 
Instructor in Simmons College, 1904-1908; Assistant Professor 
in Simmons College from 1910. 

Sigma Xi, American Chemical Society, Association of 
Collegiate Alumnae, Association of the Women of the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, American Home Economics 
Association. 

Publications: Some Peculiarities of the Proteolytic Activity 
of P'appain (with L. B. Mendel),; The Erepsin of the Cabbage. 



18 




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GEORGE PRESTON BACON, Assistant 

Professor of Physics. A.M., Dartmouth. 

Graduate work at the University of Michigan and the 
University of Berlin. 

Peekskill Military Academy, Instructor in Science; Beloit 
College Academy, Assistant Principal; Beloit College, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Mathematics; University of Wooster, 
Professor of Physics. 

Theta Delta Chi, Phi Beta Kappa, American Physical 
Society, American Astronomical and Astrophysical Society. 




SOPHRONIA MARIA ELLIOTT, Assistant 
Professor of Household Economics. 

Botany, Chemistry, and English at Harvard; Chemistry, 
Bacteriology, Sanitary Science, Biology at Institute of Tech- 
nology; Zoology, Paleontology, Physiology, Cryptogamic 
Botany, at Teachers' School of Science; Private Instruction 
in Laundering, Cooking. 

Teaching: Providence and Boston Public Schools; School 
of Housekeeping, Boston; Simmons College, 1902-. 

Publications: Chemistry of Cooking and Cleaning (joint 
author with Mrs. Ellen H. Richards), Household Bacteriology, 
Household Hygiene, articles in magazines and papers. 

Health Education League, Teachers' School of Science, 
Women of Technology Association, New England Home 
Economics Association, American Home Economics Associa- 
tion. 



ZILPHA DREW SMITH, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of the Theory and Practice of 
Philanthropic Work. 

General Secretary, Associated Charities of Boston, for 
about twenty-five years. 

Publications: Occasional articles in National Conference 
of Charities, The Survey, etc. 

Monday Evening Club, Board of Tuckerman School, one 
of Trustees of Hawk's Trust (educational), now and then 
Examiner for Civil Service positions related to Social Work. 





19 





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CHARLES FOREST RITTENHOUSE, As- 
sistant Professor of Secretarial Studies. 
Graduate of the department of business 
of Scio (Ohio) College, 1902; graduate 
of Zanerian Art College, Columbus, 
Ohio; special work in Accounting in New 
York University. 

Head of the commercial department of Northampton 
(Mass.) Commercial School, 1903-1910; Instructor in Pen- 
manship in Miss Capen's School for Girls, Northampton, 
Mass., for five years; two years in the High School of Com- 
merce, Boston. 

Member of the Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association, 
New England High School Commercial Teachers' Association, 
Universal Society cf Accountants, Inc. 

ELLA JOSEPHINE SPOONER, Assistant 
Professor of Domestic Art. Graduate 
of Framingham Normal School. 

Harvard Summer School; Simmons College, 1905-1906; 
Columbia Summer School, 1909 and 1911. 

Instructor, Perkins Institution for the Blind; Private 
Teaching, Boston Trade School for Girls, Andover Guild 
Evening Classes; Andover Guild Summer School, 1908 and 
1910; Simmons College, 1907. Alumnse Council of Framing- 
ham Normal School. 

American Home Economics Association, New England 
Home Economics Association, Eastern Manual Training 
and Art Teachers' Association, Society for the Promotion 
of Industrial Education. 




EVELYN WALKER. A.B., Bryn Mawr 
College. Secretary to the Faculty. 

Secretary Bryn Mawr College; Assistant Secretary, Miss 
Winsor's School. 



20 






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ALICE NORTON DIKE, Instructor in Household Economics. B.L., 
Smith College. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; School of Housekeeping; Teacher, Robinson Seminary, 
Exeter, N. H.; Teacher, School of Housekeeping, Boston; Experiments and Recipes in Cookery I, 
Simmons College, 1912. 

MARGARETA ELWINA MITZLAFF, Instructor in German. German 
Government Diploma as Teacher of High Schools. 

Special work at Radcliffe. 
Private School, Wellesley College. 
Bostoner Deutsche Gesellschaft. 

CAROLINE JEWELL COOK, A.B., LL.B., Instructor in Commercial Law. 

EVA LOUISE MARGUERITE MOTTET (Brevet Superieur), A.M., 
Radcliffe. Instructor in French. College of Montbeliard, France. 

Additional course, Romance Philology. 

Instructor, Wellesley College; Instructor, Simmons College from 1903. 

EDITH ARTHUR BECKLER, Instructor in Biology. S.B., Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. 

MYRA COFFIN HOLBROOK, Instructor in English. A.B., Vassar;. 
A.M., Wesleyan. 

Virginia College, Roanoke, Va.; Wesleyan Academy, Wilbraham, Mass. 
Instructor in English. 

*JANE BOIT PATTEN, S.B., Instructor in Biology. Massachusetts-. 
Institute of Technology, 1906. 

Additional courses at Technische Hochschule, Dresden, Germany. 
Instructor, Simmons College from 1906. 

ELIZABETH ALLISON STARK, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. A.B.,, 

Wellesley College; S.B., Simmons College. 

Assistant to Registrar, Wellesley College; Secretary to President's Secretary, Wellesley College. 

GERTRUDE WILLISTON CRAIG, Instructor in Secretarial Studies.. 
Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Secretary, President National Biscuit Company; Secretary, Advertising Manager Review of Re- 
views; Secretary, Commercial Department American Book Company. 
Eastern Commercial Teachers' Association. 
*On leave of absence. 

21 







ARTHUR STONE DEWING, Instructor in Psychology and Ethics. A.B., 
Harvard University, 1902; A.M., Harvard University, 1903; Ph.D., 
Harvard University, 1905. 

Assistant in Economics, Harvard University; Philosophy, Harvard University; Head of Depart- 
ment of Economics in School of Commerce and Finance (Y. M. C. A.). 

Publications: Books — History Modern Philosophy, Life as Reality, Laboratory Note Books in 
Chemistry and Biology. Periodicals — Articles on Science Teaching in School Science and Education, 
articles on Mendel's Law and Hereditary in American Naturalist, and similar publications; articles on 
Modern Philosophy in Philosophical Review; articles on Logical Subjects in Journal of Philosophy, 
Psychology, and Scientific Methods; articles on Corporation Finance and Preorganization of Corporations 
in Quarterly Journal of Economics. 

American Economics Association. 

HARRIET ROSA PECK, Instructor in the Summer Library Class. B.L., 
Mt. Holyoke, 1902; B. L. S., New York State Library School, 1904. 

Assistant, Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa.; Instructor, Summer Library School, Chautauqua, 
N. Y.; Instructor, McGill University Summer Library Class, Montreal, P. Q.; Assistant, Gloversville 
Free Library, Gloversville, N. Y.; Cataloguer, Bates College Library, Lewiston, Me.; Librarian, Rens- 
selaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y. 

American Library Association, New York State Library Association. 

AMY SACKER, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 

Housebuilding Course. 

Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston; Copley Society, Boston. 

Manager of The Amy M. Sacker School of Design, 739 Boylston Street, Boston. 

*CLARA DELLA CAMPBELL, A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Instructor in Romance 
Languages. Allegheny College. 

Instructor, Simmons College, from 1908. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

BERTHA MARION PILLSBURY, Instructor in English. University of 
Illinois, A.B., Radcliffe College, A.M., Ph.D. 

Instructor in English, University of Illinois, 1904-1906; Reader in English, Bryn Mawr College, 
1907-1908; Instructor in English, Simmons College, 1908-1911 and 1912-1913. 
Kappa Alpha Theta, Phi Beta Kappa. 

FLORENCE S. DIALL, Instructor of Physical Training. Graduate 
Sargent Normal School Physical Education. 

Wood's Hole Marine Biological Laboratory, De Pauw University; Physical Director Y. W. C. A., 
Terre Haute, Ind.; Instructor, Vassar College. 
KAO. 

American Physical Education Association. 
*On leave of absence. 

.22 







mm\m 




CHARLOTTE PENNIMAN EBBETS, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Graduate of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N. Y. (Diploma.) 

Summer work at Teachers' College, New York, in "Dietetics," and "Chemistry of Nutrition." 
Instructor in Public Evening Schools, New York City; Dietetian Hahnemann Hospital, New York 
City. 

National American Home Economic Society, New England Branch Home Economics Society. 

ANNETTE CHASE DIMOCK, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Graduate Pratt Institute, 1903. 

Dietetics, Physiological Chemistry, Nutrition and Psychology at Teachers' College, 1910. 

Instructor in Home Economics, State Normal College, Ypsilanti, Mich., 1903-1905; Pratt Institute, 
1905-1910; Farmers' Institute Lecturer, University of Maine, 1910-1911; Instructor, Summer Course, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1911. 

ISABELLA MITCHELL COOPER, Instructor in Library Science. A.B., 
Barnard; A.M., Columbia; B.L.S., New York State Library School. 

Teacher, Weingart Institute, New York City; Assistant Instructor, New York Public Library 
Training Class; First Assistant, Muhlenberg Branch, New York Public Library; Instructor Iowa State 
University Library Summer School; Reference Librarian, Free Public Library, Newark, N. J. 

Publications: Dictionary Catalogue of First Five Hundred Volumes of Everyman' s Library. 

Zeta Theta Pi, Teachers' College, Columbia University, American Library Association, New York 
State Library Association, New York Library Club, Barnard Alumnae Association, Teachers' College 
Alumnae Association, New York State Library School Alumni Association. 

GORHAM WALLER HARRIS, Instructor in Chemistry. A.B., Harvard, 
1907; A.M., Harvard, 1909. 

Research at Harvard, 1909-1910. 

Medford High School, April, 1907, June, 1908; Assistant and Teaching Fellow, Harvard, 1908-1910. 

$BK (Harvard), American Chemical Society, Association of Harvard Chemists. 

LAURA KATHERINE JOHNSON, Instructor in Physics. A.B., Mas- 
sachusetts Institute of Technology. 

<£>BK 



ALICE MABEL JORDAN, Instructor in Library Science. 

Chief of Children's Department, Boston Public Library. 

23 












BLANCHE LEONARD MORSE, Instructor in Decoration and Design. 
B.A., Smith College. 

The Amy M. Sacker Courses in Decorative Design 
Charge of The Amy M. Sacker School, 1910-1911 
College Club, Smith Alumnae. 

ABBY JOSEPHINE SPEAR, Instructor in Millinery. Special courses 
at Columbia University, N. Y., Summer Session, 1911. 

MARY BOSWORTH STOCKING, Instructor in Household Economics. 
Simmons College, S.B. 

Lewis Institute, Chicago, 111. 

Assistant in Household Economics at Simmons College; Teacher of Domestic Science at Robinson 
Seminary, Exeter, N. H.; Lectures, private classes. 

American Home Economics Association, New England Home Economics Association, Simmons- 
Club of Boston. 

MASON WHITING TYLER, Instructor in History. A.B., Amherst 
College, 1906; A.M., Harvard University, 1908; Ph.D., Harvard 
University, 1911. 

Marietta Academy, Instructor in History, 1906-1907; Instructor in History, Simmons College,, 
1910-. 

Publications: Article on Bulgaria in July number of Journal of Race Development. 

x^X, $BK, American Historical Association, New England History Teachers' Association. 

CAROLINE D. ABORN, Instructor. Education 4, Psychology of Child 
Life. 

Director of Kindergartens, Boston, Mass. 

Twentieth Century Club, Boston; International Kindergarten Union; Boston Teachers' Club r 
New England Federation of Kindergarten Clubs. 

FLORENCE TOLMAN BLUNT, Instructor in Summer Library Class. 
B.L., Mt. Holyoke College, 1896; A.B., Mt. Holyoke College, 1899; 
B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1903. 

Summer Course, Invertebrate Zoology, Woods Hole, Mass., 1896; Summer Course, New York. 
State Library School, 1901. 

Reference Librarian and Classifier, Public Library, Haverhill, Mass., 1903—. 
Mt. Holyoke College, American Library Association, Massachusetts Library Club. 



24 







RUTH BRYANT, Instructor in Biology. Simmons College, S.B. 

MARGARET COFFIN, Instructor in Household Economics. A.B., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee; B. S., Columbia University. 

Psychology and History, Summer School of the South. 

Instructor at College for Women, Columbia, S. C; Assistant Teachers' College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; Director of D. S., State Normal School, Stevens Point, Wis.; Director of D. S., Y. W. C. A. T 
Omaha, Neb. 

American Association of Home Economics, American School of Home Economics, Chi Omega, 
Phi Kappa Phi, Young Women's Christian Association. 

LESLIE BRIGGS COOMBS, Instructor in Chemistry, A.B., Harvard, 
1909; S.M., Harvard, 1911. 

Head Assistant in Qualitative Chemistry, Harvard, 1909-1911. 

Publications: A New Method of Measuring the Pressure of Corrosive Gases at Constant Volume 
(with Dr. G. S. Forbes). 

Alpha Phi Sigma Society, American Chemical Society, Graduate Association of Harvard Chemists. 

BEULAH CLARK HATCH, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College. 

Instructor in Domestic Science, Pennsylvania State College. 

HELEN REBECCA HILDRETH, Instructor in Trade School Education. 
B.S. in Education, Columbia University (Teachers' College). 

Grades, Public Schools, Minneapolis; Grades, Horace Mann School, Teachers' College; Principal,. 
Garden City, Long Island; Executive Secretary, Manhattan Trade School for Girls; State Trade School, 
Girls' Department, New Britain, Conn. Special Agent for Girls' Industrial Schools, Massachusetts State 
Board of Education, 1912. 

Delta Sigma (Local Teachers' College), North Bennet Street School Board. 

CHARLES WILLIAM LEMMI, Instructor in English. M.A., Harvard. 
Diploma, R. Istituto Tecnico G. Galilei, Florence, Italy. 

One year at R. Istituto di Studi Superiori, Florence, Italy. 

Section-master and Instructor in French and Nature-Study at Camp Marienfeld, New Hampshire, 
U. S. A. 

Publications: Some translations in Rivisa Fiorentina, and little poem in Atlantic Monthly. 

MARIE G. LUNDBERG, Supervisor of the Teaching of Household Eco- 
nomics in Social Settlements. Framingham Normal School. 

One-year special course at Simmons. 

Grade work in Public Schools of Northampton, New Bedford, and Waltham. 

Summer course at University of Vermont. 

25 



LILLIAN AZUBAH PHILLIPS, Instructor in Domestic Art. Smith Col- 
lege (two and one-half years); Graduate of Massachusetts Normal 
Art School and Fitchburg Normal School. 

At Columbia University. 

Supervisor, Manual Arts, Woonsocket, R. I.; Supervisor, Manual Arts, Fitchburg State Normal 
School. 

Publications: Magazine articles. 

Member, Eastern Manual Training and Drawing Association; Member, National Society for Pro- 
motion of Industrial Education, Smith College Club. 

Spent some time in Europe investigating Industrial Education. 



HANS WOLDO RABE, Instructor in German. A.B., c.l., Harvard. 

Graduate work at Harvard. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1907-1908. 

Harvard Deutsche Verein. Modern Language Association, Sprachverein. 



\ 



CECILIA MINNA SILLCOX, Instructor in Chemistry. B.A., from Bar- 
nard, College 1908; M.A., from Columbia University, 1911. 

Assistant in Chemistry at Barnard College, 1909-1911. 
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority. 

ABBY L. SARGENT, Lecturer on Cutter Classification. Salem Normal 
School. 

Librarian, Wilmington, N. C; Middlesex Mechanics Association, Lowell; Medford Public 
Library. 

American Peace Society, Appalachian Mountain Club, Massachusetts Library Club, American 
Library Association, National Geog. Society. 

*WILLIAM THOMPSON SEDGWICK, Ph.B., Ph.D., Lecturer on Sani- 
tary Science and Public Health. Ph.B., Yale University, 1877; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1881. 

Professor of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Biologist to Massachusetts Board 
of Health; Curator Lowell Institute, Boston; Trustee, Simmons College; Lecturer, Simmons College, 
from 1902. 

General Biology; Principles of Sanitary Science and Public Health. 

St. Botolph Club, Warren Farm Golf Club, Board of Directors, Sharon Sanitarium. 

ELIOT THWING PUTNAM, Lecturer on Architecture. A.B., Harvard. 

Instructor in Architecture at Harvard. 
*On leave of absence. 



26 



F. MELBOURNE GREEN. B.L., California, 1892; Ph.D., Berlin, 1908. 

How to Enjoy Art, ten lectures at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, October. December, 1911-1912. 
^Esthetic Contrasts between Modern Masters; ten lectures, Boston Public Library, Saturdays, 10.30. 
now in progress. 

Universally Extensive Lecturer, California, 1901. 

Publications: In prospect. (1) Development of Style in the Imitative Arts from the Origin of the 
Present Day; (2) How to Enjoy Art, a Concrete Drill in ^Esthetic Appreciation; (3) Aesthetic Contrasts 
between Modern Masters. 

Resided in Europe, with occasional visits home, from 1892 to 1908. 

Charles Francis Dorr Belden, LL.D. 

Librarian of State Library of Massachusetts ; 
Lecturer on Library Science. 

SELSKAR M. GUNN, Assistant Professor of Biology. S.B., M. I. T., 1905. 

Bacteriologist in the Boston Biochemical Laboratory; Bacteriologist for the Iowa State Board of 
1905-1906; Health Lecturer on Hygiene in the University of Iowa, 1906-1908; Health Officer, Orange, 
N. J., 1908-1910; Assistant Professor of Public Health at Technology since 1910; Lecturer on Hygiene 
at Tufts Medical College since 1911. 

Secretary of the American Public Health Association; Managing Editor of the American Journal 
of Public Health. 

Member of several Scientific Societies. 

MARIAN GAGE, Assistant in Household Economics. 

Boston Cooking School, Physics at Columbia Summer School. 

Assistant Dietitian at State Sanitarium, Rutland, Mass.; Teacher of Cookery, Boston Public 
School; Teacher of Cookery at Robinson Seminary, Exeter, N. H. 

New England Home Economics Association, National Home Economics Association. 

HELEN GOLLER, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. Wellesley College, 
A.B.; Simmons College, B.S. 

Secretarial position in Philadelphia. 

CHARLOTTE FARRINGTON BABCOCK, Instructor in English. Rad- 
cliffe, A.B.; A.M., Ph.D. 



Teacher at Miss Carroll's School, Boston; Teacher at Misses Smith's School, Cambridge; Private 
Tutoring; Assistant in English at Simmons College, 1911-1912. 
Radcliffe Alumnae Association, Radcliffe Union. 

27 









GERTRUDE FRANCES BARBOUR, Assistant in Biology. S.B., Sim- 
mons College, 1910; S.M., Simmons College, 1911. 

Sewing Classes, Quincy Evening School; Sewing and Cooking Classes, Missss Allen's School for 
Girls, West Newton. 

FRANCES ROUSMANIERE DEWING, Assistant in Psychology and 
Ethics. Wellesley, A.B., 1900; A.M., 1904, Radcliffe, Ph.D., 1906. 

Instructor in Mathematics' and later in Philosophy at Mt. Holyoke College; Instructor in Philosophy 
at Smith College. 

Publications: Two articles in the Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods; 
one article in Vol. II of Harvard Psychological Studies. 

American Philosophical Association, American Psychological Association, Association for the 
Advancement of Science, Agra Society of Wellesley College. 

MARTHA WELLS HENRY, Assistant in Household Economics. 

One-year Institutional Management at Simmons College. 
Teaching, Charlemont, Mass. 

HELEN LUITWIELER, Assistant in the Library. A.B., Smith College, 
1910. 

One-year college graduate course at Simmons College. 

Apprentice for two months in the Springfield City Library; Assistant for one month for the Massa- 
chusetts Free Public Library Commission. 

ELSIE EVELYN MORSE, Instructor in Household Economics. S.B., 
Simmons College, 1911. 

Assistant in Household Economics, Simmons College, 1911-1912. 

MADELAINE LUELLAH SCOTT, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. 
Simmons College, B.S., 1911. 

Phi Gamma Ki. 

MARGUERITE DOROTHEA TSCHALER, Assistant in Physics. A.B., 
Boston University, 1911. 

Graduate Courses in Philosophy and Physics. 

Cambridge Evening Schools. 

Epsilon Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Gamma Delta, Doura Club 

JENNIE BLAKENEY WILKINSON, Assistant in Secretarial Studies. 
S.B., Simmons, 1911. 

28 



GRACE HILL, Instructor in Library Science. Ph.B., Grinnell College, 
Iowa, 1906; B.L.S., New York State Library School, 1912. 

Courses at Iowa Summer Library School, 1906, 1908; Assistant in Grinnell College Library, 1902- 
1907; Librarian in Oskaloosa, Iowa, 1907-1909; Branch Librarian of the Queensborough Library, New 
York City, 1909-1911. 

JULIA E. MOODY, Instructor in Biology. B.S., Mt. Holyoke College, 
1894; M.A., 1909; Ph.D., Columbia University, 1912. 

Saturday Classes of Johns Hopkins University, 1902; study at Marine Biological Laboratory, 
Woods Hole, 1905, 1908. 

Instructor at Mt. Holyoke College, 1905-1911. 

Publications: Little Busy Bodies and a Holiday with the Birds (Story-told Science series, Harper 
Bros.); monograph: Observations on the Life History of two rare Ciliates, Spathidium Spathula and Acti- 
n bolus Radians. 

FLORA B. PRYOR, Instructor in Secretarial Studies. Graduate of Busi- 
ness School, Simpson College, Indianola, Iowa. 

Instructor in Business School, Simpson College; Principal of the Shorthand Department of Water- 
bury Business College, Waterbury, Conn., 1902-1911. 

Publications: Several articles on Commercial Trai ling. 

SARA H. STITES, Instructor in Economics. A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1889; M.A., 1900; Ph.D., 1904. Student in Economics, Geography, 
and Ethnography at the Sorbonne and at the College de France, 
1900-1901; University of Leipzig, 1901-1902. 

Co-principal of the Wilkes-Barre Institute, 1901-1912. 
Publication: Economics of the Iroquois (1904). 

HARRY M. VARRELL, Instructor in History. A.B., Bowdoin, 1897; 
A.M., 1900; A.M., Harvard, 1909; Ph.D., 1912. 

Instructor in University of New Mexico, 1897-1898; Instructor in University of Colorado, 1899-1901 ; 
Brooklyn Latin School, 1901-1902; Pueblo High School, 1904-190?; Austin Teaching Fellow at Harvard 
University, 1909-1912. 

Delta Kappa Epislon, Phi Beta Kappa, American Historical Association. 

CANEMA BOWERS, Assistant in Biology. S.B., Simmons College, 1912. 

JENNIE P. CLEMENT, Assistant in Biology. S.B., Simmons College, 
1912. 

Candidate for degree of Master of Science. 
New England Home Economics Association. 

MARION EDNA BOWLER, Instructor in Romance Languages. B.A., 
University of Idaho, 1909; M.A., Radcliffe College, 1912; University 
of Paris; Guilde Internationale; University Grenoble, France. 

Head French Teacher, Kent Place, Summit, N. J.; Instructor in French, Wellesley College; In- 
structor in French, Simmons College. 

Publication: Travels All Though Europe. 
Gamma Phi Beta. 

29 




-.■' *■>.:■! rii*-.:."'' 



!»Mll»llSfflP3 



FRANCES T. E. BOYD, Instructor in Institutional Management; Course 
in Institutional Management, Simmons, 1908. 

House Superintendent and Bursar at St. Agnes School, Albany, N. Y. 

ANNA G. DAVIS, Instructor in Sewing. Diploma in Domestic Art, 
School of Domestic Science of Boston Y. W. C. A., 1907; Diploma 
in Domestic Science, 1908. Chicago University Summer School, 
1910; Teachers' College, 1911. 

Chicago University Summer School, 1910; Teachers' College, 1911. 
Instructor in Boston Y. W. C. A. School of Domestic Science, 1908-1912. 

ELIZABETH M. GOODRICH, Instructor in Institutional Management 
and House Superintendent of the Simmons College dormitories. 

Assistant House Superintendent, Simmons College. 
Travel in England and Europe. 

KATHERINE K. CROSBY, Assistant in English. A.B., Boston Uni- 
versity, 1909. 

Instructor in English at Grafton High School, 1909-1911. 

Publications: Several articles, stories, and poems in the Youth's Companion, Pictorial Review, 
Smart Set, and Ladies' World. 

AMY FACKT, Assistant in Household Economics. Illinois Woman's 
College, 1903; B.S., Simmons College, 1912. 

HOPKINS, ALICE LUCILE, Assistant Librarian. A.B., Smith College, 
1905; Bridgewater Normal School, 1906; Simmons College, 1907- 
1908. 

Assistant Librarian, Radcliffe College, 1908-1911; Assistant Librarian, Smith College. 1911-1912. 

FLORENCE K. NEWELL, Assistant in Design. Amy M. Sacker School 
of Design. 

FLORENCE C. SARGENT, Assistant in Chemistry. S.B., Simmons 
College, 1911. 

Research Assistant at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

30 



€>ux Wovk 

^•P^HE life of every individual and ever}' institution naturally falls into 
\f\j distinct periods. At the end of each of these it is equally natural 
to review the achievements of the past, and to sum up the assets of 
the present. The result of such a self-examination may be so great a 
satisfaction in the past that all effort for the future is paralyzed, or it 
may incite to still greater endeavor. This latter is what all hope and 
expect from Simmons College, which last October ended the first ten years 
of its existence. 

While the college is to be congratulated upon all it has acquired, it 
is well to remember that the chief assets of a college are not the visible land, 
buildings, and equipment, but the scattered and invisible body of graduates. 

Even now one year has gone of those whose work will be reviewed 
at the end of the next decade. In that time great changes are sure to come 
in economic, educational, and industrial life; — changes in which intelligent 
women will prove more active than ever before. It is not too much to 
expect Simmons women to have a very large part in bringing about the 
best, results in all of these movements. At present there are over two 
thousand Simmons women scattered over the country. These are daily 
occupying positions of greater influence, as they prove themselves not 
only well trained for technical work, but also "worthy of trust." Among 
them are workers in public service and workers in their own homes; — all 
women who help to form public opinion. On these, and on those who will 
go out from the college during the coming years, is laid the duty of making 
for Simmons each year, till 1922, the record of ten years PLUS. 

Mary Esther Robbins. 



1313 CLASS SOMG 



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A -wake, be- hole) «, Clr. ss - mates All, We stA-nd In «ns« f v to "the call, Our 

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/\ love -foy At- -ma Ma- +o 1 Seep Within <»r hearts we'll ev- ev keep, Ano 



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serve "th^e e v - ev- 
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at- tvauj true a „d faith -f "I be, Wfr'tl 
at - Wavs ti«ve a. l»st - y ch,eev ""Piv 



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It-en. can ■vter-er- drift a.- part U'e, 
crtve thee praise and ho^i-o^- duff , We'll 



cctne +d prove oov- 
foupht +o- geth-J-r 
ilrivf +o Sv>al<e ouv 



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-to showl^er, a^d h t?av ' L ' "*° heart 

•itaunch, tru« blue', 



Nineteen thirteen, can 
Sh.au'oev +o ihoi/'Jev and 
Qrave n0h!e, pure a*v\ d 



stand the- test", 
heart to heart. 

-staunch, ''rue olue 



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Carl Fischer, New York. 
No. 10-12 lines. 

Mnite in Germany 



Marie W. Gurdy 

Vice-President 



Class of 1913 




(Officers 

Amy Leonard 

President 



Mary Dutton 

Treasurer 



Mabel A. Spear 
Secretary 



35 




iiifgMi 





This square is a memorial 
to our Freshman Year, when we 
had the scarlet fever, or rather, 
the scarlet fever had us. We did 
not have any Freshman frolic, 
but we had a vacation. Every- 
thing wasn't as bright and cheery 
as this memorial would indicate; 
its fiery appearance rather sug- 
gests the way we looked and felt 
when we were obliged to attend 
college late in June on account of 
our fever vacation. 





Oow 1 - 



<TVv\.OT_e_ 



0-i^y^\CjnJLO\\J 



'Wi 



1 



I 3, \<\ 11 



incurs 



■J QJld- OKr^ou^A^^.^>JOo 
SaXaA CMjuv^ Stic 

SoSJouL 'VuZfe 



36 





■ Pi 'fi '■'■ :■■?■ P; 




At last, a degree! All the things 
we haven't wanted are gone, and what 
we have looked forward to for four 
years has come. The only trouble we 
have is that we can't think, whether 
we are glad or sorry to go, but if 
only you, the other classes, are sorry, 
we shall be glad you are — and that 
will make us sorry. 



PROM 

Pretty dress, ah yes! 
Silken tail to trail; 
Dainty feet, so fleet, 

Nice low neck! 

Such short sleeves! 

In spite of all 

The lady grieves. 

Evening fair, quite rare, 
Perfect bowers of flowers: 
Violins tune, then croon, 
Ready all, 
Gloves and fan, 
All on time — 
Except the Man. 




37 




HELEN AGATE 

''We meet thee, like a pleasant thought, 
When such are wanted." 

Pittsford, New York 

Pittsford High School; Livingston Park Seminary, Rochester, 

New York 
Honor Committee (1); Class President (2); Mandolin Club (4) 






HELEN ALMY 

"She was not inclined to labor 
For herself or for her neighbor, 
For she dearly loved her ease!" 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 
New Bedford High School 



CLARISSA BABCOCK 

"Yet was it ne'er my fate from thee to find 
A deed ungentle or a word unkind." 

Norwood, Massachusetts 

Norwood High School 

Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Choir (2, 3, 4); Basket Ball (1, 2, 3, 4); 
Track (2, 3, 4); Track Manager (2); Vice-Chairman of 
Council (4); President of Musical Association (4) 



38 



JOSEPHINE BAKER 

"As headstrong as an allegory on the 
banks of the Nile." 

303 Harvard St., Brookline, Massachusetts 

Brookline High School 

Tau Beta Beta; Committee on Student Conduct (4) 



DOROTHY BLAKE 
"A maiden never bold." 

Woburn,. Massachusetts 
Woburn High School 



HELENE A. BOEHMKE 

"Noble in thought and act, 
And practised what she preached." 

2076 Cornell Road, Cleveland, Ohio 

Central High School, Cleveland 

Chairman Sophomore Luncheon Committee; Class President 

(3); Vice-President Student Guild (3); Dormitory Student 

Government Council (3) 




39 




SUSAN BROWN 
"She has a speaking eye." 

Luverne, Minnesota 

Luverne High School, Cornell College, University of Wis- 
consin 
Gamma Gamma Gamma; President Y. W. C. A. (4) 



\ 



JEANETTE BURKE 
'To all she was polite without parade." 

Three Rivers, Michigan 

Three Rivers High School; Rockford College, 1909-1911 



MARION BUTTRICK 
"A mind at peace with all below." 

Arlington, Massachusetts 
Arlington High School 



40 



MILDRED CATE 

"Glad in her wisdom, 
But never unduly elated." 

34 Dearborn Street, Salem, Massachusetts 
Salem High School 



MARY E. CHAMBERLAIN 
'Thinking is but an idle waste of thought." 

Manchester, New Hampshire 
Manchester High School 
Glee Club (1); Choir (1) 



ESTHER CHAPIN 

"But hark! the chiming clocks to dinner 
call." 

Worcester, Massachusetts 
Classical High School, Worcester 
Glee Club (3); Choir (3) 




41 






HILDA A. COMBE 
"We ask and ask." 

23 Stratford Road, Providence, Rhode Island 
Pope Street High School, Providence 






MARCELLA CURRY 
"Dispatch is the soul of business." 

4 Forest Street, Lynn, Massachusetts 
Lvnn English High School 



ELIZABETH H. DAY 
"Contradict me, and live?'' 

Bellows Falls, \ ermont 

Bellows Falls High School 

Choir (2, 3, 4); Glee Club (2, 3, 4); Microcosm Board (1, 2); 

Prom Committee (3); Cabinet Y. W. C. A. (4); Chairman 

Vesper Committee (3) 



42 



OLIVE DIALL 
"I am nothing if not critical." 

Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
Normal Training School, Brooklyn 

Corridor Committee (3); Literary Editor Microcosm (4); Ways 
and Means Committee (4); Lunch Room Committee (4) 



MARION DONALDSON 

"Pleasure's the only noble end 
To which all human powers should tend." 

Fairfield, Connecticut 

Bridgeport High School 

Class Secretary (1); Class Vice-President (2); President S. A. 
A. (4); Track Manager (3); Track (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club 
(1, 2, 3, 4); Choir (1, 2, 3, 4); Basket Ball (1, 2, 3, 4) 



MARY DUTTON 



"I happy am; 
Joy is my name. 

East Craftsbury, Vermont 
East Craftsbury High School 
Class Treasurer (3, 4) 






43 




KATHERINE FREDERICK 

"Lord! I wonder what fool it was that 
first invented kissing." 

Methuen, Massachusetts 

A'lethuen High School 

Vice-President Guild (3); Executive Committes (2, 4) 



EDNA FOWLE 
"For she is wise, if I can judge of her." 

Woburn, Massachusetts 

Woburn High School 

Secretary to Editor of Quarterly (4) 



ALICE GALLAGHER 

"... brows of wisdom, broad and high." 

502 East Fourth Street, South Boston, Massachusetts 
Girls' High School, Boston 



44 



MARJORIE GODDARD 

"Though care and strife 
Elsewhere be rife, 
Upon my word I do not heed 'em." 

Wallingford, Connecticut 
Wallingford High School 
Choir (3); Glee Club (3); Manager of Dormitory Store (4) 



FLORENCE GOLDSMITH 

"And has withal the sunniest eyes 
That ever dazzled a logician." 

Dorchester, Massachusetts 

Roxbury High School 

Prom Committee (3); Honor Committee (2) 



MARIE GURDY 
"None but thyself could be thy parallel." 

Rockland, Maine 
Rockland High School 

Class Secretary (2); Basket Ball (1, 2, 3,4); Class Vice-Presi- 
dent (4); Chairman of the Council of the Guild (4) 




45 




HELEN HAMLIN 
"Never brag, never bluster, never blush." 

Gorham, New Hampshire 
Gorham High School 



ANNE HARWOOD 



Mark me, how still I am!" 



Athol, Massachusetts 

Athol High School; Smith College, 1909-1911 



JEANETTE B. HINCHLIFF 

"Where none are beaux, 'tis vain to be a 
belle." 

Rockford, Illinois 

Rockford High School 

Tennis (2); Business Manager of Microcosm (4) 



46 



DOROTHY HUGH ITT 

"Content with nothing rather than with 
second-best." 

83 Seymour Street, Auburn, New York 
Auburn High School 

Basket Ball (1,2, 3, 4); Track (2, 3); Class Vice-President (1); 
Guild Vice-President (3) 



KATHRYN HOLDEN 

'There are occasions and causes why and 
wherefore in all things." 

Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Roxbury High School 
Glee Club (3); Choir (3) 



FRANCES HUELSTER 
"Duty calls, anon." 

215 Miller Street, Michigan City, Indiana 

Michigan City High School; Western College, Oxford, Ohio 




t/ 



47 




HAZEL IRWIN 
"Zealous, yet modest," 

Ayer, Massachusetts 
Aver High School 



LAURA JOHNSTON 
"Men of few words are the best men." 

Milford, Massachusetts 

Milford High School 

Glee Club (3, 4); Choir (3,4) 



MARION KEELER 
"As you sew, so must you rip.' 

Roxbury, Massachusetts 
Roxbury High School 



48 



ELSIE KELLAWAY 

"Never taxed for speech." 

Newton, Massachusetts 

Newton High School 

Choir (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4) 



AMY LEONARD 

"Never elated when one man's oppress'd, 
Never dejected while another's blessed." 

Stoughton, Massachusetts 

Stoughton High School 

Prom Committee (3); Class President (4) 



LOUISE LOCKE 
"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merit." 

Sturbridge, Massachusetts 
Southbridge High School 






49 




HELEN McINTYRE 

"She had withal a merry wit, 
And was not shy of using it." 

425 Crescent Street, Brockton, Massachusetts 
Brockton High School 



\ 



GERTRUDE MANDELSTAM 



"For every season she hath dressings fit, 
For winter, spring, and summer." 

132 Sumner Street, East Boston, Massachusetts 
East Boston High School 



BLANCHE McDUFF 



"And some are born to lead where'er they 

go-" 
"Lead on, MacDuff." 

11 Marlboro Street, Newton, Massachusetts 
Newton High School 



50 



LOUISE M.GURK 

"Life is too short for mean anxieties.' 

37 North Milton Street, Maiden, Massachusetts 
Maiden High School 



MARGARKT MOSES 

"God made her small, in order to do a 
more perfect piece of workmanship." 

1356 North Broadway, Knoxville, Tennessee 
Knoxville High School; University of Tennessee 
Chi Omega 




KATHERINE MURPHY 



"Let knowledge grow from more to 
more." 

88 Francis Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
Bellows Falls High School, Vermont 




51 




MARAGRET NILES 
"Dearie, my dearie." 

44 Bay Avenue, Bloomfield, New Jersey 
Barringer High School, Newark, New Jersey 
Class Secretary (3); Prom Committee (3) 



ABBY PARMENTER 






"She will, and she will not — she grants, 
denies, 
Consents, retracts, advances, and then 



fli 



les. 



Attleboro, Massachusetts 
Attleboro High School 
Prom Committee (3) 



EDITH PARSONS 



"Carries a right rare humor under sober 



mien. 

East Hartford, Connecticut 
Endfield High School 



52 



MARGARET PARKER 

"Trittaty trot, trittaty trot, 
The faster she went, the farther she 
got." 

Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts 
West Roxbury High School 



ELIZABETH THURSTON 

"... No force, 
Persuasion, no; nor death could alter 
her." 

52 Elm Street, Melrose, Massachusetts 
Melrose High School 



MADGE TROW 

"She laughs at impossibilities and cries, 
'It shall be done!'" 

40 Sarvin Street, Marlboro, Massachusetts 
Marlboro High School 




53 




LILLIE PECK 

"You may believe that I know well what 
I am about." 

S3 Prospect Street, Gloversville. New York 
Gloversville High School 

Chairman Ways and Means Committee (4); Dormitory Stu- 
dent Government Council (4) 






JEANETTE PELLMAN 



"It is undignified to hurry, and much 
work is a great exertion for my fragile 
form." 

Hamburg, New York 
Hamburg High School 

Ckss President (1); Student Government Committee (2); 
Basket Ball (1, 2, 3, 4); Varsity (1) 



VERA PINKS 



"Ah, what a change four years have 
wrought." 



39 Columbia Street, Meriden, Connecticut 
Meriden Hieh School 



54 



MABEL PETTENGILL 

"In came Mrs. Fezziweg, 
One vast, substantial smile." 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 
Winchester High School 



ELIZABETH PLATTS 
"I am as sober as a judge." 

Holbrook, Massachusetts 
Thayer Academy, Braintree 



ANNABEL PORTER 



When, like spoiled children, women cry 
for the moon, it is because they have 
heard that the moon contains a 



man. 



10 Winchester Street, Gloucester, Massachusetts 
Gloucester High School 

Basket Ball (1, 4); Glee Club (3); Choir (3); Track (3, 4); 
Prom Committee (3) 




55 




ROSINA RINE 
'There is none like her, none." 

Caldwell, New Jersey 






ESTHER M. ROBBINS 



I ought to have my own way in every- 
thing, and what's more I will, too." 



Monson, Massachusetts 
Monson Academy 



ELLA ROSE 

"Of soul sincere, 
In action faithful and in honor clear." 

29 President Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island 
Cambridge High School 
President Student Government (4) 



56 



ANNIE SAMPSON 
"My heart is true as steel." 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Plymouth High School 

Chairman of Committee on Student Conduct (?); Council of 
Guild (4) 



MARY SCOTT 

'Tis alas, her modest, bashful nature 
That makes her silent." 

19 Lexington Street, Waverley, Massachusetts 
Belmont High School 



HANNAH SHEPARD 

"One could mark her merry nature 
By the twinkle in her eye." 

48 Harvard Avenue, Brookline, Massachusetts 
Brookline High School 




57 




MABEL SPEAR 
''Woman's at best a contradiction still." 



84 Marble St., West Roxbury 

West Roxbury High School 

Class Treasurer (2); Class Secretary (4) 



MILDRED STARRETT 

"He trudg'd along unknowing what he 
sought, 
And whistled as he went, for want of 
thought." 

Athol, Massachusetts 

Athol High School 

Cabinet Y. W. C. A. (4); Student Conduct Committee (4) 



SADIE ST. CLAIR 

"A woman either love's or hates, she 
knows no medium." 

Newport, Rhode Island 
Rogers Hill School 



58 



JULIA STEVENS 

"The quiet mind is richer than a crown." 

Middletown, N.Y. 
Middletown High School 
Secretary Y. W. C. A. (4) 



GERTRUDE SULLIVAN 
" Why aren't they all contented like me? 

92 Foster St., Brighton 

Brighton High School 

Secretary and Treasurer Glee Club (2); Manager Glee Club (3) 



NELLIE SWANBURG 

"Full well she laughed, in solitary glee 
At her own jokes, for many a joke had 
she." 

Shelburne, N. S. 

Shelburne Academy 

Art Editor Microcosm (4) 




59 




ELIZABETH M. WALKER 

"Life's a joke, and all things show it, 
I thought so once, and now I know it." 

9 Millbrook Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 

Lawrence High School 

Glee Club (1, 2,3,4); Secretary and Treasurer (3); Manager (4); 

Choir (1,2, 3, 4); Track (1, 2, 3, 4); Vice-President S. A. A. 

(2, 3); Basket Ball (1, 2, 3, 4); Manager Basket Ball (2, 3. 

4); Student Conduct Committee (3); Literary Editor 1912 

Microcosm; Varsity Basket Ball (2, 3, 4); Editor-in-Chief 

1913 Microcosm 



\ 

IRENE WEED 
"We are but children of a larger growth." 

Lowell, Massachusetts 
Lowell High School 

Basket Ball (1); Choir (2, 4); Glee Club (2, 4); Chairman 
Soiree Committee (3) 



EDNA WELLS 
"Oh! I would sleep, would sleep forever. 

New London, Connecticut 

New London High School 

Student Editor Quarterly (3); Microcosm Board (4) 



5> 



60 



DORIS WILBER 

"It is true that I can love but one person 
at a time." 

1 Irving Street, West Medford, Massachusetts 
Medford High School 



EMILY E. WOODWARD 
"Would all did so well as I." 



Melrose Street, Framingham, Massachusetts 

Framingham High School 

Choir (1, 2, 3, 4); Glee Club (1, 2, 3, 4); Microcosm Board (4) 



MARION WILLIAMS 
"Order is heav'n's first law." 

9 Kingsdale Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts 
Girls' High School, Boston 
Glass Treasurer (2) 




61 










ANABEL MARSAC 

"Neither a borrower nor a lender be; 
For loan oft loses both itself and friend; 
And borrowing dulls the edge of 
husbandry." 

197 Grafton Avenue, Newark, New Jersey 

Barringer High School; Newark Normal and Training School 




62 





lilOiiBlliilfl^ 



#oob=b£>, Jfrom 1913 



Dear Alma Mater, when you gave us tasks 
— Too hard, it seemed, to compass in the day. 
Blindly, though understanding not, we said, 
"We will obey." 

Through all the years we've tried to give to you 
Our loyal best, and now we can but say, 
"Our hopes are granted, if your stamp upon our brow 
We bear away." 

Good by, then, Alma Mater, oh, good-by, 
We cannot know all you have been to us, to-day, 
But you have made us Women, and as such, please God, 
We shall repay. 



63 



'GREAT OAKS FROM 















1. 

2. 
3. 


Abby 
Sadie 
Childe Gallagher 


4. 

5. 
6. 


Baby Anne 7. 
Little Hannah 8. 
Edie Parsons 9. 

(From Left to Right) 


Lovey H. 
Maggie N. 
Petty 


10. 
11. 
12. 


Susie Chapin 
Baby Flo 
Flossie 



LITTLE ACORNS GROW" 















13. 


Keeler 


16. 


Vena 


19. 


Madge 


22. 


Baby Irwin 


14. 


Jo 


17. 


The Young McDuff 


20. 


Bethie Platts 


23. 


Rosie 


15. 


Infant Blake 


18. 


Little Mary C. 


21. 


Johnston 


24. 


Young Moses 



Cla&S of 1914 




Officers; 



Marion Y. Ostrander 

President 



Ava Bassett 

Vice-President 



Florence Gallant 
Treasurer 



\ 



Lillian Nisbet 
Secretary 



Clasig of 1914 



Name 
ABBOTT, GLADYS L. . 
ALEXANDER, ADA E. . 
ANDERSON, HELEN M. 
ANDREWS, MARION . 
ASHENDEN, CONSTANCE 
ASHLEY, ROSAMUND W. 
ATKINS, HELEN G. . 
ATKINSON, MILDRED 
ATWOOD, HORTENSE F. 
AYER, DORIS L. . 
BAILEY, MARTHA P. . 
BAKER, GERTRUDE F. 
BARTO, MARJORY I. . 
BASSETT, AVA S. . 
BASSETT, INEZ E. 
BEETLE, CLARA . 
BELL, LUCY S. . 
BRAY, FLORENCE A. . 
BROWN, EDITH . 
BROWN, LYDIA G. 
CARLETON, HELEN F. 
CLARK, ANITA Q. 
COLTON, OLIVE M. . 
CRAWFORD, CORA A. . 
CROWELL, JENNIE 0. 
DAVIS, ANNA J. . 
DAVIS, FLORENCE J. . 
DAVOL, DOROTHY M. . 
DILMAN, MABEL A. . 
DOHERTY, MARY A. . 
DORING, LAURA L. . 
DOYLE, AGNES T. 
DUNNING, FRANCES M. 
EASTON, CANDACE 
EKSTRAND, CONSTANCE G 
ELA, ELIZABETH P. . 
ESSICK, INEZ H. . 
FARNHAM, HELEN M. 
FINDLEY, SARAH M. . 
FORD, GERTRUDE 
FREEMAN, AMY F. 
GALLANT, FLORENCE B. 
GARTLAND, AGNES C. 
GASPEY, ETTA M. 
GORE, DOROTHY R. . 
GRANTHAM, FAYE B. . 



Home 

Franklin 

Los Gatos, Cal. 

La Crosse, Wis. 

Holliston 

Newton 

New Bedford 

Quincy 

Melrose 

Natick 

Plymouth, N. H. 

E. Montpelier, Vt. 

Quincy 

Waterbury, Ct. 

Taunton 

Taunton 

New Bedford 

Beverly 

Pawtucket, R. I. 

Grafton 

New Bedford 

Haverhill 

Hartford, Ct. 

Fairlee, Vt. 

Boston 

Medway 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Somerville 

Geneva, N. Y. 

Scituate 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Bangor, Me. 

Monroeville, O. 

Boonton, N. J. 

Cambridge 

Des Moines, la. 

Dover, N. H. 

Kokomo, Ind. 

Pembroke 

Milton, N. S. 

Exeter, N. H. 

Boston 

Melrose 

Newton 

Wilmington, O. 



69 








Name 

hanson, mabel l. . 
hardy, louisa h. 
hatch, agnes v. 
huelster, frances 
hughitt, frances s. 
huntington, katharine m. 
kennedy, elizabeth g. 
kimball, gladys a. 
klein, ruth b. . 
lamont, a. marie 
laurin, nina . 
lawrence, lillian m. 
le valley, sarah h 
libby, norma l. 
McCarthy, mary a. 

MacKAY, HELEN G. 
MacNAIR, VERA . 
McRORY, MARY B. 
MARSAC, ANABEL 
MARSH, MILDRED R. 
MILLER, RUTH S. 
MILLS, ELSIE C. . 
MOORE, ANNA M. 
MOORE, ELIZABETH P 
MORGAN, EVELYN C 
MUELLER, PAULA F. 
MURPHY, ELSIE R. 
NEALE, ALICE J. 
NEWCOMET, EDITH 
NISBET, LILLIAN F. 
ORVIS, SARAH W. 
OSTRANDER, MARION Y. 
PAGE, MARGARET E. 
PAGE, MILDRED W. 
PARKER, RUTH H. 
PARMLEY, MARJORIE 
PATTEN, LOUISE . 
PERRY, EDNA E. 
PERRY, JOSEPHINE C. 
PETERSEN, HELEN I 
POORE, EMMA F. 
POORE, MARGUERITE 
POTTER, MARGARET A. 
RANDALL, IONA M. . 
RAYMOND, LELIA 
REID, CHARLOTTE E. 
RICHARDSON, EDITH F 
RICKER, HARRIETTE J. 
ROGERS, JULIA M. 



Home 

Rockingham, N. H. 

Hollis, N. H. 

Newton 

Michigan City, Ind. 

Auburn, N. Y. 

Spuyten Duyvil, N. Y. 

Worcester 

Lowell 

Natick 

Dillon, Mont. 

Boston 

Wakefield 

Hope, R. I. 

Brookline 

Haverhill 

Fall Ritter 

Houghton, Mich. 

Port Henry, N. Y. 

Newark, N. J. 

Muncie, Ind. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

Marietta, O. 

Somerville 

E. Cleveland, O. 

Gloucester 

E. Cleveland, 0. 

Cleveland, 0. 

Rehoboth 

Manchester, Vt. 

Schuylerville, N. Y. 

Franklin 

Haverhill, N. H. 

Northfield, Vt. 

Upper Montclair, N. J. 

Newton 

Brookline 

Topeka, Kan. 

Concord 

. Watertown 

. Watertown 

Sharon 

Brockton 

Essex 

Newton 

Millie 

Turner, Me. 

Pelham Manor, N. Y. 



70 




mm 




Name 
ROUNDY, RUTH A. 
RUDD, MARGARET . 
RUSSELL, DOROTHY . 
SACKETT, REBECCA . 
SALISBURY, H. EDITH 
SARGENT, CLARA S. . 
SMALL, MARION L. . 
SMITH, HELEN P. 
SMITH, MARGERY M. 
SMITH, MARJORIE G. . 
STEARNS, G. ESTELLE 
SUTHERLAND, MARGARET 
TAGGART, CLEMENTINE 
TAISEY, AGNES L. 
THORNILY, MARGARET F. 
TRAIN, CONSTANCE . 
TURNER, M. LILLIAN 
TYACKE, DOROTHY . 
WARREN, KATHERINE 
WHITING, RUTH K. . 
WHITNEY, SARAH F. . 



A. 



Home 

Randolph, Vt. 

. Blue Island, 111. 

Plymouth 

Providence, R. I. 

Schuylerville, N. Y. 

Boston 

Saugus 

Somerville 

Skowhegan, Me. 

. Wakefield 

Cleveland, O. 

Brookline 

Wooster, O. 

Lowell 

Marietta, O. 

Wellfleet 

Wellesley 

Boston 

Grafton 

Gt. Barrington 

Natick 




71 




BDPHDH0RE5 



Cla&$ of 1915 







Officers; 

Anita Allen 
President 



Kathryn Gordon 

Vice-President 



Margaret Ives 
Secretary 



Evelyn Emerson 
Treasurer 



74 



Class of 1915 



Name 
ABBOTT, GLADYS C. 
ALDRICH, HELEN C. 
ALLEN, ANITA M. 
ALLEY, FRANCES N. 
AMES, HARRIET C. 
ANDERSON, EDITH V 
ANDREWS, HELEN B. 
BABSON, ALICE E. 
BAKER, DOROTHY N. 
BATCHELLER, MARGARET 
BATEMAN, RUBY W. . 
BEAMISH, GWENDOLYN S. 
BECKLEY, CONSTANCE C. 
BEECHER, LENA C. . 
BENT, MILDRED M. . 
BIGELOW, GLADYS M. 
BOARDMAN, MIRIAM H. 
BRANN, MARGARET E. 
BROWN, MILDRED B. 
CARPENTER, JENNETTE R 
CARTLAND, LUCIA H. 
CARTLAND, MARIAN P. 
CHAFFIN, ISABELLE L. 
CLARK, ELINOR . 
CLARK, EVA W. . 
CLARK, MARGARET M. 
CLARKE, DOROTHY M. 
CLEMENCE, GERTRUDE B 
COLONNA, EILEEN A. 
COOK, EVELINE B. 
CORWIN, MARJORY . 
•CRAWFORD, HELEN . 
CRAWLEY, M. GENEVIEVE 
CROSBIE, R. GLADYS . 
CROSS, MARIAN F. 
DANFORTH, M. ELSIE 
DANIELS, ELLEN S. . 
DAVIS, MILDRED A. . 
DAY, THERESA M. 
DELANO, LOUISE J. . 
DIMICK, MILDRED E. 
DINEEN, MARY D. 
DODGE, CAROLYN F. . 
DOWNEY, DOROTHY H. 
DRAKE, EDNA F. 
DWYER, FRANCES T. . 
EATON, RUTH M. 



Home 

Bridgton, Me. 

Boston 

Manchester, N. H. 

Cortland, N. Y. 

N. Attleborough 

Boston 

Hudson 

Gloucester 

Newport, R. I. 

Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Boston 

Waltham 

Newton 

Cortland, N. Y. 

Lynn 

St. Albans, Me. 

Marblehead 

Bangor, Me. 

Groton 

Mansfield, O. 

Dover, N. H. 

Saco, Me. 

Worcester 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

Lubec, Me. 

Haverhill 

Holden 

Southbridge 

Washington, D. C. 

Boston 

Haverhill 

. Cambridge 

Gloucester 

Boston 

Fitchburg 

Arlington 

Fitchburg 

Alton Bay, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

, Birmingham, Ala. 

Easton 

. Cambridge 

Boston 

Sharon 

Boston 

Boston 



75 




gjsEi 




Name 
EMERSON, ALTA J. . 
EMERSON, EVELYN . 
FALL, KATHARINE 
FENNELL, ANNIE R. C. 
FOWLER, ETHEL K. . 
FREEMAN, ELIZABETH K. 
FRIZELL, DOROTHY R. 
GERALD, HELEN T. . 
GILE, HELEN 
GILLESPIE, RHEA M. . 
GORDON, G. GLADYS . 
GORDON, KATHRYN T. 
GRANT, PEARL A. 
GRAVES, MARGARET E. 
GREENE, GLADYS M. . 
GREENE, LYDIAN H. . 
HALE, CECILIA M. 
HALE, HAZEL 
HAPGOOD, RUTH M. . 
HATCH, RUTH W. 
HAYWARD, ELEANOR 
HIBBARD, M. FLORENCE 
HIGHT, ELSIE D. 
HINDS, HELEN . 
HOGAN, MARGARET L. 
HOLDEN, KATHERINE F. 
HOLMES, MARGARET F. 
HOOKER, FRIEDA C. . 
HUBBARD, ANNA 
HYLAND, WINONA C. . 
IVES, MARGARET 
JENKINS, FLORENCE L. 
JENKINS, MAUDE E. . 
JOHNSON, LEANNA F. 
JOHNSTON, EDITH 
JOST, BESSIE L. . 
KANE, CHRISTINE J. . 
KEEGAN, ELLEN S. . 
KENNEDY, MARION E. 
KENNISON, ELIZABETH L. 
KILBOURN, HAZEL 
KLOSS, ANNA A. . 
LANE, CONSTANCE . 
LARKIN, ELSEY W. . 
LAWRENCE, C. WINIFRED 
LEFFINGWELL, IRMA M. 
LEONARD, MARION F. 
LIBBY, MILDRED A. . 



F 



Home 
Wellsville, N. Y. 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Somersworth, N. H. 
Boston 
Maiden 
Central Falls, R. I. 
Boston 
Canton 
Melrose 
N. Tonawanda, N. Y. 
W. Newbury 
Milton 
Boston 
Orono, Me. 
Milton 
Greenfield 
Sherb.ooke P. Q. 
Portland, Ct. 
Hartford, Ct. 
Maiden 
Walpole, N. H. 
Natick 
Sharon 
Stoneham 
W. Newbury 
Portland, Me. 
Plymouth 
Barre, Vt. 
Boston 
Springfield 
Hartford, Ct. 
Reading 
Newton 
Norfolk 
Boston 
Boston 
Spencer 
Cambridge 
Dover, N. H. 
Boston 
Gt. Barrington 
W. Boylston 
. Winchester 
Le Roy, N. Y. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Burlington, Vt. 
Abington 
Concord, N. H. 



76 



Name 

light, anna e. . 
livingston, alice c. 
logan, lillian a. . 
luce, helen l. . 
ludgate, jessie h. . 
lurvey, m. pauline 
mccormick, gertrude m 
Mcdonald, theresa a. 
Mcdowell, ella r. . 

McMANAMA, ALICE C. 
MARDEN, KATHERINE 
MASON, NINA A. . 
MERRILL, MILDRED S. 
MIDDLETON, KATHARINE J. 
MINOTT, GLADYS E. . 
MIRICK, L. LOUISE . 
MURPHY, JANET S. . 
MYERS, LOIS N. . 
NEWTON, HARRIETT M 
NICKERSON, BERTHA 
OBER, HELEN P. . 
O'BRIEN, HELENA V. , 
PARKHURST, ANNIE L. 
PEIRCE, RUTH B. 
PERLEY, L. MARGARET 
PERRY, ELINOR . 
PIERCE, LILLIAN M. 
PIKE, LUCILE P. . 
PINKHAM, MARY A. 
PINNOCK, LORNA 
PIPPEY, EDITH J. 
PLATTS, RUTH A. 
POLAND, NELLIE G. 
POTWINE, MARJORIE A. 
PRATT, MARY G. 
PROUDFOOT, AGNES R. 
PUTNAM, HARRIET . 
RANDALL, ELEANOR T. 
RAY, ALICE M. . 
REID, F. MARION 
RIDLEY, CONSTANCE J. 
RING, MARTHA D. 
ROONEY, KATHARINE E. 
RUBY, OLIVE C. . 
SCHWARTZ, MARGUERITE R. 
SEARS, MILDRED G. . 
SHAW, GERTURDE A. . 
SHAW, IMOGENE G. . 



Home 
. S. Coventry, Ct. 
Manchester, N. H. 
Leicester 
Pittsfield 
Beaver, Pa. 
Boston 
Boston 
Ludlow, Vt. 
Needham 
Waltham 
Boston 
Pawlet, Vt. 
Leominster 
Boston 
Gardner 
Worcester 
Boston 
Boonton, N. J. 
Brookline 
Somerville 
Ashland, N. H. 
Framingham 
Fitchburg 
Somerville 
Cambridge, Vt. 
Natick 
Holbrook 
Med ford 
Portland, Me. 
Salem 
Gardner 
Holbrook 
Lebanon, N. H. 
E. Windsor, Ct. 
Boston 
Boston 
Lansdowne, Pa. 
Hampstead, N. H. 
Boston 
Boston 
Brookline 
Quincy 
Boston 
Oneida, N. Y. 
Newton 
Brookline 
Quincy 
Adams 



77 




§mm 




Name 

SHAW, MARJORIE 

SHEA, KATHARINE B. 

SHEEHAN, JANE . 

SIMS, MARGARET 

SISSON, CLARA M. 

SMALLEY, MARIE F. 

SMITH, DOROTHY F. 

SNYDER, MARGARET T. 

SPARROW, CAROLINE D. 

SPRAGUE, CAROLINE E. 

SPRAGUE, MARGARET M. 

STICKNEY, ESTHER L. 

STONE, RUTH P. . 

STRONGMAN, BESSIE T. 

SUTCLIFFE, MARJORIE 

SWIFT, ANNA H. . 

TAFT, MARTHA E. 

TA VENDER, OTTILIA K. 

TAYLOR, JANETTE M. 

THOMAS, JULIA E. 

THOMAS, KATHARINE J. 

THOMPSON, LAURA F. 

THOMPSON, MARGARITA 

THROSSELL, DOROTHY 

TINGLEY, LOUISE C. . 

TITCOMB, MARION 

TOMPSON, GERTRUDE E. 

TOROSSIAN, CHRISTINA 

TURNER, A. REBECCA 

UNDERWOOD, MARJORIE T 

UPHAM, ANNE T. 

VARNEY, MILDRED C 

VORIES, RUTH E. 

WAVLE, HAZEL H. 

WAVLE, LILLIAN A. 

WELLINGTON, MARJORIE V 

WELLS, KATHARYN W. 

WESTCOTT, MILDRED B. 

WETMORE, MARION C. 

WHITCOMB, LOUISE R. 

WHITE, MARIE . 

WHITTIER, DOROTHY J. 

WILDE, GLADYS F. . 

WILLIAMS, ELIZABETH M. 

WILLIAMS, HILDA C. . 

WOODS, DOROTHEA C. 

WYLIE, MARGARET E. 

YAGER, PAULINE M. . 



Home 
Belfast, Me. 

. Manchester 

Maiden 

. New Haven, Ct. 

Cumberland Mills, Me. 

Dennis 

. Watertown 

Newton 

Boston 

Quincy 

Turner, Me. 

Maiden 

Somerville 

Boston 

Plymouth 

Milton 

. Gloucester 

Boston 

Maynard 

Gloucester 

Alstead Center, N. H. 

Salisbury, N. Y. 

Waverley 

Cleveland, O. 

Boston 

Northampton 

Portland, Me. 

Chelsea 

Reading 

Boston 

Keene, N. H. 

Boston 

Pueblo, Colo. 

. Cambridge 

Cortland, N. Y. 

Adams 

. Leominster 

Rumford, Me. 

Boston 

Holbrook 

Cookeville, Tenn. 

Leominster 

Littleton 

W. Concord, N. H. 

Milford 

Boston 

Scranton, Pa. 

Watertown, N. Y. 



78 



o 







mCSHMEN 



Elizabeth Little 
Vice-President 



Cla&S of 1916 




Lydia Woodbridge 

President 



Opal Fisher 
Treasurer 



Ellen Foster 

Secretary 



81 



Clagg of 1916 



Name 
ADAMS, MARION G. . 
ALDEN, ANNIE L. 
ANDERSON, ADAH E. M 
ANDREWS, MARION L. 
ARMANT, GOLD A B. . 
ARMSTRONG, DOROTHY M 
BAKER, CLARA D. 
BAKER, ELINOR . 
BALLARD, ALICE J. . 
BANKS, FRANCES B. . 
BARNICOAT, OLIVE M. 
BASTON, LINA F. 
BECKLEY, MAY J. 
BELL, DOROTHY G. . 
BERRY, IRMA L. . 
BLAISDELL, HELEN H. 
BOUVE, G. ELIZABETH 
BOUVE, MILDRED 
BOYLE, MARY L. . 
BRAGDON, EDNA W. . 
BREHM, GERTRUDE . 
BRETT, I. OLIVE . 
BREWSTER, EVELYN . 
BROWN, ESTELLA I. . 
BROWN, FLORENCE M. 
BROWN, MARGARET R. 
BROWNLIE, E. ALINE . 
BURNES, MARGUERITE C. 
BURNS, MARGARET 
CABOT, HELEN L. 
CARLING, WINIFRED 
CARY, HELEN H. 
CHANDLER, ADELE 
CHAPIN, DOROTHY A. 
CHASE, LAURA P. 
CLARK, BERTHA E. 
CLARY, LOUISE V. 
CLEVELAND, MADELINE 
COATS, ELLA M. . 
COKER, E. MARGUERITE 
COMMONS, M. FRANCES 
CONNOLLY, MARGARET A. 
CORNISH, HAZEL M. 
CORWIN, RUTH B. 
COSGROVE, HELEN L. 
CUMMINGS, RUTH 



Home 
Rockland 
Boston 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Norwalk, O. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Boston 
Tisbury 
Needham 
Meredith, N. H. 
Barrington Passage, N. S. 
Quincy 
Sanford, Me. 
New York, N- Y. 
Boston 
Maiden 
Lewiston, Me. 
Brookline 
Newton 
Salem, 0. 
York Village, Me. 
Waterloo, N. Y. 
Greenville, Me. 
Wolfboro, N. H. 
Collinsville, Ct. 
Putnam, Ct. 
Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Davenport, la. 
Chelsea 
Arlington 
Winchester 
Oxford 
Lowell 
Plymouth 
Somerville 
Dedham 
Portland, Me. 
Maiden 
Houlton, Me. 
Cooperstown, N. Y. 
Somerville 
Newton 
Chelsea 
Bowdoinham, Me. 
Newark, N. J. 
Worcester 
Providence, R. I. 



82 






fe^> Bqjgs ^---- . ■■■■•■■••■ -^ ^ f •-•••■■ ■ ••:•■•■ ■ itl , w? e>, 





Name 
CUNNIFF, JOSEPHINE M. 
CUNNINGHAM, MARY H. 
CURRIER, MARGARET S. 
CURTIS, GERTURDE W. 
DAVIS, LOIS H. . 
DEMING, KATHERINE 
DERBY. DOROTHY 
DEWEY, DOROTHY P. 
DIXON, GLADYS L. . 
DONOVAN, IRENE E. . 
DOWD, URSULA M. . 
DRINKER, RACHEL R. 
EDGERLY, BEATRICE J. 
EDWARDS, JULIA A. . 
EMERSON, GLADYS M. 
ENSLIN, ESTHER 
FELDENTHAL, LEONTINE 
FIELD, MARY E. . 
FISH, MARION G. 
FISHER, J. OPAL 
FISHER, LUCILE C. . 
FLAHERTY, MARY M. 
FLAVELL, MARION L. 
FOOTE, LEONE M. 
FOSTER, ELLEN . 
FOSTER, HELEN B. 
FOSTER, HELEN M. . 
FOWLER, ELIZABETH 
FULLER, BEATRICE L. 
GANE, E. MARGUERITE 
GEER, GLADYS V. 
GIBLIN, ESTHER A. . 
GIERE, HELEN P. 
GILMAN, DOROTHY . 
GLOVER, KATHERINE 
GOULD, MYRA C. 
GRANT, MADELEINE Y. 
GRAY, ALICE T. . 
GRAY, RENA 
GREEN, FLORENCE M. 
GREEN, HELEN . 
GRIFFIN, GWENDOLEN 
HAGAN, VESTA S. 
HALEY, ALICE H. 
HALL, FRANCES E. 
HALL, GRACE E. . 
HAMMOND, MILDRED M. 
HAMMOND, RUTH 



E. 



Home 

Brookline 

Cambridge 

E. Kingston, N. H. 

Cambridge 

Roslyn, N. Y. 

Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Somerville 

Springfield 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Ware 

Quincy 

Farmington, N. H. 

Fonda, N. Y. 

Andover, N. H. 

Ashland 

Boston 

Leverett 

Somerville 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Boonton, N. J. 

Worcester 

. Marshfield 

Mt. Morris, N. Y. 

Central Falls, R. I. 

Swampscott 

Hingham 

. Concord, N. H. 

Clinton 

Keene, N. H. 

Scotland, Ct. 

Utica, N. Y. 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Tilton, N. H. 

Danvers 

Holyoke 

Boston 

Revere 

Arlington 

Briantree 

Cambridg 

Pittsfield, Me. 

Boston 

Beaver, Pa. 

Canandaigua, N. Y. 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Somersworth, N. H. 

Newton 



83 



Name 
HARRISON, MARY J. . 
HARTFORD, MABEL E. 
HAWKES, ESTHER J. . 
HAWKINS, MIRIAM E. 
HAWLEY, ESTELLE E. 
HAYE, LOLA L. . 
HAYES, LORETTA M. . 
HAYES, RUBY P. 
HEIMER, MARGARET G. 
HESELTINE, MARJORIE M 
HILL, LUCILE W. 
HILLS, MARION . 
HODGES, GRACE A. 
HOITT, MABEL V. 
HOLDEN, ETHEL M. 
HOLLAND, G. MARION 
HOUGHTON, EDNA P. 
HOWE, RUTH F. . 
HOWLETT, ELSIE M. . 
HUBBARD, FLORENCE P. 
HUDNUT, RUTH A. . 
HUGHES, DOROTHEA M. 
HUMPHREY, ELLEN H. 
HURLBUTT, ISABELLE B. 
HURLEY, MILDRED T. H. 
HUSSEY, GERTRUDE F. 
HUSTED, HELEN G. . 
HUTCHINS, MILDRED G. 
HUTZLER, BERTHA F. 
INGLIS, DOROTHY B. . 
JACKSON, ELEANOR . 
JACOBI, EVA 
JACOBS, ELIZABETH P. 
JACOB SON, DORA 
JONES, HELEN S. 
JOUVETTE, MAE A. E. 
KEEGAN, FRANCES E. 
KEIRSTEAD, KATHLEEN S 
KELLAM, HELEN D. . 
KELLY, MARY C. 
KNOWLES, BEULAH A. 
La GANKE, RUTH E. . 
LANDER, JEANNETTE F. 
LAWRENCE, EVELYN L. 
LEAMY, JULIA A. 
LEONARD, KATHARINE M 
LITTLE, AMELIA W. . 
LITTLE, ELISABETH . 



Home 
Torrington, Ct. 
Duxbury 
Boston 
Lancaster 
Pittsford, N. Y. 
Westwood 
Bridgeport, Ct. 
Hamilton 
Unadilla, N. Y. 
Portland, Me. 
Hartford, Ct. 
Natick 
. Foxborough 
Lynn 
Shirley 
Shrewsbury 
Ansonia, Ct. 
Cambridge 
. Cambridge 
Concord 
Brookline 
Milton 
Rochester 
Stamford, Ct. 
Worcester 
Albany, N. Y. 
Brookline 
Randolph, Vt. 
Norwich, Ct. 
Grosse He, Mich. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Boston 
Tupper Lake, N. Y. 
Chelsea 
Stamford, Ct. 
New Bedford 
W. Newbury 
Lynn 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Portsmouth, N. H. 
Jamestown, R. I. 
Cleveland, O. 
Bingham, Me. 
Binghamton, N. Y. 
Fairhaven, Vt. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Newburyport 
Glen Ridge, N. J. 



84 



Name 

littlefield, hazel o. 
lofstedt, s. christina 
lowell, eleanor n. 
lowenstam, pauline 
luce, esther . 
luthin, frances e. . 
McCarthy, mary k. 

McDUFF, CLAUDIA E. 
McGRATH, MARGARET E. 
MAHAR, ELSIE . 
MANN, MARGARET E. 
MARTIN, HELEN E. . 
MASSON, JEAN E. 
MATHER, KATHARINE 
MEADER, PEARL E. . 
MELCHER, VELMA 
MILLER, GERTRUDE M. 
MORRISON, E. KATHRYN 
MOWER, HARRIET S. . 
MUNGER, CLARA L. . 
MUNRO, BERNICE E. . 
NAGLE, ANNA R. 
NIMMS, MARY A. 
O'BRIEN, MARY A. 
O'CALLAGHAN, ELIZABETH 
O'KANE, K. EILEEN . 
O'REILLY, ANNA L. . 
O'REILLY, MARY I. . 
PERRY, DOROTHA K. . 
PERRY, MARION R. . 
PHELAN, RACHEL R. . 
PHILBRICK, BLANCHE C. 
PHILBROOK, HELEN A. 
PHILLIPS, GRACE P. . 
PIKE, EVELYN C. 
POND, EDNA L. . 
POTTLE, HELEN B. . 
PRATT, HELEN M. 
RANDALL, HELEN 
READY, MILDRED M. 
REARDON, ROSE D. . 
REYNOLDS, ELLA I. . 
RHODES, EDNAH G. . 
RICHARDSON, ESTHER A 
RIGHTER, CAROLINE . 
RILEY, MARY L. 
ROBBINS, FRANCES M. 
ROBERTSON, AGNES E. 



A. 



Home 

Peak's Island, Me. 

Boston 

Newburyport 

Manchester, N. H. 

Boston 

Boston 

Sandwich 

Newton 

Fitchburg 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y. 

Lewistown, Pa. 

Rutland, Vt. 

Lowell 

Charleston, S. C. 

Lynn 

Barre, Vt. 

Chelsea 

Muncie, Ind. 

Boston 

Catskill, N. Y. 

Boston 

Acton 

Albany, N. Y. 

Boston 

Boston 

Newton 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Manchester, N. H. 

Weston 

Medford 

Epsom, N. H. 

Maiden 

Carthage, N. Y. 

Lubec, Me. 

Newton 

Farmington, Me. 

Salem 

. Wakefield 

Boston 

Worcester 

Canton 

Quincy 

Brookline 

Port Jervis, N. Y. 

Cambridge 

Arlington 

New Haven, Ct. 



85 



Name 

ROBINSON, HARRIET E. 

ROBINSON, HELEN M. 

RODGERS, FRANCES V. V. 

RODLER, HILDA M. . 

ROGERS, ELEANOR A. 

ROOP, RUTH L. . 

ROSS, FLORENCE M. . 

ROUNDS, ALICE M. . 

RUSSELL, MADELINE T. 

RUSSELL, SARAH O. . 

SAFFORD, EMILY 

SALLS, MARY W. 

SAMPSON, ELIZABETH 

SAUNDERS. ELIZABETH V 

SAWYER, GEORGIA L. 

SCHULTZ, A. LOUISE . 
SHALZ, PAULINE A. . 
SHAW, MARY L. . 
SHERMAN, ETHEL M. 
:SILLESKY, FLORENCE 
SINCLAIR, MARGARET E. 
SMITH, MARION L. 
SMITH, MILDRED C. 
SMITH, MYRTLE D. 
SOPER, MARJORIE 
SPEAR, ELIZABETH 
SPENCER, ANNA L. 
STACKHOUSE, ELLEN R. 
STAPLES, BEULAH R 
STARK, MARION E. 
STEARNS, EDITH L. 
STEARNS, LUCY W. 
STERLING, KATHERINE B. 
STEVENS, MARGUERITE 
STEVENS, MIRIAM 
STEVENS, MURIEL 
STINSON, MARGARET 
STONE, ALICE A. 
SULLIVAN, MARGARET A. 
SWEENEY, NORA 
TAPPAN, KATHARINE B. 
THAYER, NORA F. 
THOMAS, GERTRUDE W. 
THOMPSON, MARGARET V 
TIBBETTS, DOROTHY M. 
THUS, OLIVE M. 
TODD, ELIZABETH P. . 
TOLMAN, MARGARET . 



Home 

Ipswich 

St. George, Me. 

Manila, P. I. 

Davenport, la. 

Sanbornville, N. H. 

Arlington 

Revere 

Providence, R. I. 

Boston 

Lawrence 

Chelsea 

Framingham 

Muncie, Ind. 

N. Attleborough 

Saugus 

Latrobe, Pa. 

Boston 

Rockland 

Liberty, Me. 

Lockport, N. Y. 

Boston 

Menands, N. Y. 

Waltham 

Boston 

Naugatuck, Ct. 

Walpole 

Malone, N. Y. 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Manchester, N. H. 

Manchester, N. H. 

Winchester 

Portland, Me. 

Somerville 

Arlington 

Boston 

Windsor, Ct. 

Maiden 

Worcester 

Lawrence 

Braokline 

Boston 

Western Springs, 111. 

Cincinnati, 0. 

Washington, D. C. 

Newton 

Somerville 

Portland, Me. 



86 



Name 
TUCKER, ESTHER F. 
TULIS, MARY E. . 
TWITCHELL, MAY F. 
UPHAM, HELEN N. 
WADE, DOROTHY E. 
WALKER, RUTH E. 
WALSH, M. LOUISE 
WARDWELL, LORNA A. 
WARING, M. ELMERE 
WEBB, EMILY G. 
WEBBER, LILLIAN 
WELCH, MARGARET M. 
WHEELER, ALICE M. . 
WHEELER, MARION D. 
WHITE, SARA A. . 
WHITEHEAD, MARGARET 
WHITING, MARTHA A. 
WHITNEY, MARGUERITE 
WILKINSON, MARION A. D 
WILSON, ELEANOR . 
WITT, RUTH H. . 
WOLCOTT, RUBY M. . 
WOOD, ELLA L. . 
WOODBRIDGE, LYDIA M 
WOODMAN, GLADYS E. 
WOODWARD, BLANCHE 
WRIGHT, HELEN M. 
WRIGHT, LENA . 
YATES, MARGARET 
YATES, MARJORTE 
YOUNG, HELEN E. 



Home 
Portland, Ore. 

Weston 

Framingham 

Duluth, Minn. 

Stoughton 

Manchester, N. H. 

Manchester 

Stamford, N. Y. 

Brookline 

Rockland, Me. 

Newton 

Wellesley 

Waltham 

Sharon 

Unadilla, N. Y. 

La Grange, 111. 

Franklin 

Wrentham 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Shinglehouse, Pa. 

Brookline 

Duluth, Minn. 

Westborough 

Franklin 

Worcester 

Ogdensburg, N. Y. 

Boise, Ida. 

Boise, Ida. 

Brockton 




87 




AND 



5. 



I. H5. 



College #rabuate Club 




Louise Ufford, President 
Wellesley, 1912 

Evelyn Aldrich, Vice-President 
Wellesley, igog 

Mary Welles, Secretary 
Elmira, 1912 

Grace Sargent, Treasurer 
U. of S. D., 1912 

Jane Blood, 1911 

Representative at Student Guild Council 

Rebecca Ranken, Michigan, 1911 
Representative at Committee on Student Conduct 



90 




Madeleine Bradbury 
Chairman 



Institutional jWanagement Class 



Name 
BETTELL, MILDRED . 
BRADBURY, MADELEINE 
BREYFOGLE, PHOEBE 
CARTER, ALICE . 
CUMMINGS, BESSIE . 
DE FOREST, GEORGIANA 
GERARD, JESSIE . 
GERARD, MARGARET B. 
HARTWELL, EDITH . 
LARTER, ROBERTA . 
SMITH, ESTELLE 



Home 

. Blue Hill, Me. 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Lake George, N. Y. 

Bethel, Me. 

Saco, Me. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

S. Norwalk, Ct. 

S. Norwalk, Ct. 

Fitchburg 

Cleveland, O. 

Fayetteville, N. Y. 



91 



College #rabuate* 



Name 
BLOOD, JANE, A.B. 
BREWER, DOROTHY E., A.B. 
BROWN, HELEN G., A.B. . 
BROWN, ISABEL C, A.B. . 
BROWNE, ELEANOR W., A.B. 
BURNS, MADELINE A., A.B. 
CALLAGHAN, AGNES L., A.B. 
CAMPBELL, BERTHA, Ph.B. 

campbell, m. margaret, a.b 
carver, helen, a.b. 
coburn, harriet, b.l. . 
cole, gladys s., a.b. 
cummer, bessie r, a.b, . 
danforth, edith s., a.b. 
darling, harriet l. b., b.l. 
elliott, faith w., a.b. . 
ellis, cornelia h., a.b. . 
emerson, ruth v., a.b. . 
engle, elsie r., a.m. 
english, elisabeth d., a.b. 
everett, bernice j., a.b. 
fay, adra m., a.b. . 
flynn, helen v., a.b. 
gardner, beatrice a., a.b. 
grafton, eloise g., a.b. 
hall, helen, a.b. 
haseltine, elizabeth a., a.b 
herman, maida, a.b. 
hunnewell, hazel, a.b. 
king, anna, a.b. 
knowlton, marion, a.b. 
lanman, faith t., a.b. . 
loomis, elizabeth b., a.b. 
lovell, bertha c, a.b. . 
lovell, harriet j., m.d. 
McCarthy, Caroline h., a.b. 
mackay, susan h., b.l. . 

MacNAUGHTON, MARY E., A.B. 
MARSH, ELIZABETH, S.B. 
MAUCK, K. JOY, A.B. . 
MAYO, ADELAIDE A., A.B. 
MUDGE, ADA, A.B. 
NORRIS, ETHEL L., A.B. 
NORTHRUP, SARAH L., S.B 
ODELL, CORINNE V., A.B. 



Home 

Cambridge 
Boston 
Ipswich 
Woburn 
Cambridge 
Ayer 
Haverhill 
Towanda, Pa. 
Claremont, Cal. 
. Cambridge 
Lowell 
Newton 
Cleveland, 0. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Brookline 
Hillsdale, Mich. 
Shawsville, Va. 
Cambridge 
Ben Avon, Pa. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Quincy 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Swampscott 
Cambridge 
Marietta, O. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Haverhill 
Boston 
Winchester 
Stamford, Ct. 
Newton 
Cambridge 
Norwood 
Fall River 
Boston 
Boston 
Brookline 
Fort Edward, N. Y. 
Berea, Ky. 
Hillsdale, Mich. 
Boston 
Maiden 
Brookline 
Lynn 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



92 



Name 
PILLSBURY, MARY B., A.B. 
POPE, ANNA E., A.B. . 
POTTER, HOPE L., S.B. 
RANKIN, REBECCA B., A.B. 
REYNOLDS, BERTHA C, A.B. 
ROCKWOOD, EMILY P, A.B. 
ROGERS, WINIFRED, A.B. . 
SARGENT, GRACE E., A.B. . 
SAWYER, CAROLINE G., A.B. 
SHEARER, HERMIONE, A.B. 
SIBLEY, EMILY, A.B. . 
SIMPSON, ADA W., A.B. 
SMILEY, CAROLYN D., A.B. 
SMITH, H. ESTELLE, A.B. . 
STOTT, JENNIE S., A.B. 
STURTEVANT, EDNA M., A.B. 
SWEENEY, M. LOUISE, A.B. 
UFFORD, LOUISE R., A.B. . 
VINAL, MILDRED H., A.B. . 
VINAL, NELLY P., A.B. 
VINCENT, HOPE E., A.B. . 
WELLES, EMILY F., S.B. . 
WELLES, MARY A, S.B. 
WHEELER, ELEANOR P., A.B. 
WOLHAUPTER, ALICE C, A.B. 
WOODBRIDGE, ELIZABETH D., A.B. 



Home 

Lowell 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Claremont, Cal. 

Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Stoughton 

Calais, Me. 

. Cambridge 

Vermilion, S. D. 

Newton 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

. Cambridge 

Newburyport 

Farmington, N. H. 

Easthampton 

Southbridge 

Somerville 

Lawrence 

Boston 

Vinalhaven, Me. 

Vinalhaven, Me. 

Boston 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Elmira, N. Y. 

Brookline 

New Rochelle, N. Y. 

Williamstown 




93 



Uncla&itfieb g>tubent£ 



Name 
ABELS, MARAGRET H., A.M 
ADAMS, EDITH T., A.B. 
ALDRICH, EVELYN H., A.B 
ALEXANDER, MARGARET 
ALLAN, BERTHA . 
ALLISON, J. OLIVE 
ANDERSON, LILLIAN M. 
ANDREWS, ELISABETH 
BALDWIN, DEBORAH N. 
BALDWIN, RUTH, A.B. 
BEANE, EDITH E. 
BLACKALL, ELIZABETH V 
BLANDIN, ETHEL I., A.B. 
BORGESON, SIGNELD K. 
BROOKS, IDA L., A.B. . 
BRYANT, ALICE deV. 
BURKE, HELENA R. . 
BURROWS, GEORGIA H. 
CARR, LORETTA W. . 
CHENEY, ELEANOR M. 
CHENOWETH, MARY L. 
CLARK, CAROLINE G. 
COBB, BESSIE S. . 
CONGDON, EDITH M. . 
CROTHERS, MARGERY L. 
CROKE, MARY G. 
DAVIS, MOLLIE D. 
DOWNEY, MARY A. . 
DUBUC, AGNES T. 
DUCKWORTH, JESSAMINE E. 
DUNICAN, ESTHER M. 
DUNLOP, IDA A. . 
EATON, PAULINE 
FENN, DOROTHY 
FOGARTY, GRACE M. . 
FOLEY, GEORGIANA W. 
FULLER, MARION A. . 
FULTON, CHRISTINA . 
GAFFNEY, HELEN L. . 
GENEREUX, DESANGES, A.B. 
GIBLIN, MARY M. 
GIELE, ELLA H. . 
GOLDSTEIN, REBECCA 
HALL, CLARA E. . 
HAMLIN, ELINOR C. . 
HARMON, HAZEL 



Home 
Waukesha, Wis. 
Canton 
Brookline 
Boston 
Cambridge 
Boston 
Boston 
Brookline 
Newton 
Newton 
Whitman 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Northampton 
Oakland, Cal. 
Aberdeen, S. D. 
Cohasset 
Boston 
Vermilion, 0. 
Boston 
S. Manchester 
Boston 
Melrose 
Somerville 
Portland, Me . 
Cambridge 
Boston 
Taunton 
Easton 
Boston 
Worcester 
Boston 
Meriden, Ct. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Cambridge 
Boston 
Bostoa 
Everett 
Waltham 
Whitman 
Webster 
Boston 
Dayton, O. 
Newburyport 
Burlington, Vt. 
Brookline 
Meriden, Ct. 



94 




w4 Is,*'-. S" 








HAYWARD, MARION W. 
HELLER, MARGARET S. 
HENDERSON, MARION M 
HICKSON, E. NOELINE 
HILLS, RUTH E. . 
HOLLAND, MABEL H. . 
HOPKINS, ALICE M. . 
HUMPHREY, KATHARINE S. 
HUNT, HENRIETTA . 
HUNTLEY, VERNETTE H. 
IVY, MILDRED, A.B. . 
JERDONE, WILLIE McK. 
KENDALL, ANNIS, A.B. 
KIGGEN, HELEN J. . 
LAUDERDALE, JENNIE E. 
KIMBALL, MARION A. 
LEAVITT, MARGARET R. 
LIBBY, C. PEARL 
LIBBY, ESTHER V. 
LINCOLN, HELEN A. 
LOWRY, MARY B. 
McABEE, MARY V. 
McCALL, RUTH, A.B. 

McCarthy, alice l. 

McCLOSKEY, LOUISE H 
McINERNEY, MARGARET K 
McKENNA, MOLLIE . 
MAHONEY, MADELEINE E 
MARQUAND, ELIZABETH 
MASON, MARTHA B. . 
MULLIKEN, ETHEL L. 
NARDINI, BEATRICE T. 
NASH, EMILY C. . 
NEWHART, GRACE, A.B. 
NEWELL, CONSTANCE M. 
PARKER, HELEN E., A.B. 
PATTON, LAURA B. . 
PIERCE, CAROLINE A. 
PORTER, NINA M. 
PURDY, MARGUERITE O. 
REED, LUCY D., S.B. . 
ROGERS, MARY E. 
ROHRBACHER, ELIZABETH P. 
ROMANI, HOPE F. 
SALTER, JEANETTE E. 
SALTER, LILLIAN E. . 
SCHUMANN, EDNA E. 
SCULLY, SARAH P. 



H; 



Home 

Easton 
Hingham 
Hingham 
. Butler, Pa . 
Hollis, N. H. 
Easton 
. Cambridge 
Roxbury, Ct. 
Santa Monica, Cal. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Newton 
Washington, D. C. 
Newton 
Boston 
Dyersburg, Tenn. 
Maiden 
Newton 
Milford, Me. 
Concord, N. H. 
Brookline 
Dewart, Pa. 
Boston 
Winchester 
Easton 
Boston 
Newton 
Wilton, N. H. 
Lawrence 
. Cambridge 
Marblehead 
Lexington 
Concord, N. H. 
Maiden 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Boston 
Winthrop 
Portland, Ore. 
Brookline 
Boston 
Boston 
Whitman 
pton Institute, Va. 
Iowa City, la. 
Milford, N. H. 
Cleveland, O. 
Cleveland, 0. 
Everett 
Cambridge 



95 



Name 
SHAW, LENA F. . 
SILLIMAN, GLADYS . 
SIMMONS, ETHEL 
SPITZ, EDNA 
STIMSON, MARTHA C. 
STOECKLEIN, FLORENCE 
SULLIVAN, KATHERINE 
SUTTER, MINNIE 
TAYLOR, HELEN M. . - 
TUBMAN, C. MARGARET 
UPHAM, MARION E. . 
WALSH, ELIZABETH M. 
WHITCOMB, FRANCES M., S.B. 
WILLIAMSON, KATHERINE 
WILSON, M. FRANCES. 
WILSON, MARY J. 
WORTHINGTON, LESLIE D. 
WRAFTON, EDITH M. . 
WRIGHT, M. EUNICE . 
WYNER, FRANCES R. . 



Home 
Boston 
Maiden 
Rusk, Tex. 
Brookline 
Fitchburg 
Dayton, O. 
Brookline 
Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Newton, la. 
Quincy 
Boston 
Brookline 
Holbrook 
Boston 
Cambridge 
Salem 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 



96 




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®t)e grtubent <§utlb 



The number of students in our college has increased so rapidly during 
the last few years that the Guild, as it existed before, could no longer serve 
the purpose for which it was organized. In accordance with the new con- 
stitution, which was drawn up and accepted by the classes last spring, 
every student in college is still a member of the Guild, but the organization 
is different. The government is now vested in a Council, composed of the 
president and vice-president of each class, and one representative from 
each of the other college organizations. It is hoped that by including such 
representatives the Council members may have as broad and far-sighted 
knowledge of conditions as possible, and that whatever action is taken 
will be taken with a complete understanding of its relation to the college 
as a whole. The Council meets regularly to discuss any questions which 
may arise concerning either new activities or traditions already established. 

Among other things which the Council is doing, and one which will 
perhaps do more than any other in strengthening the spirit of fellowship 
and loyalty among the girls is the effort which is being made to raise an 
endowment fund for the college. A committee has been appointed and 
is already at work making plans which we hope will meet the approval 
and earnest co-operation of every Simmons girl. 

In accordance with the constitution the chairman of the Guild Council, 
and the president of the Dormitory Student Government Association, were 
sent as delegates to the annual conference of the Women's Inter-collegiate 
Association for Student Government, which was held this year at Wells 
College. The program was not only interesting, but it afforded an ex- 
cellent opportunity to hear discussed the ways in which other colleges 
were meeting just such problems as we need to solve here. The Guild,, 
under the new form of organization is an important factor in the college,, 
and we hope to see it meet with the greatest success. 

Marie W. Gurdy. 



99 




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The Student Government Association of the Simmons College dormi- 
tories was started in Simmons Hall on St. Botolph Street in 1905, but was 
not formally organized until May, 1906. Since then it has been steadily 
growing in importance. The governing body is a Council, the members 
of which are a Senior President, a Vice-President, who is Chairman of the 
Guild Council, a Junior Secretary, a Sophomore Treasurer, a House Chair- 
man from each house, including Mrs. Blackley's in Brookline, and four 
Representatives from Peterborough House. On each floor in the halls 
and in each of the small houses are proctors. This year a new plan is 
being worked out of electing new proctors every six weeks instead of for 
the whole year. 

Council meetings have been held once a month. Frequent floor 
meetings and house meetings have also been held to keep up interest among 
the girls. Short talks have been given us at times by Miss Arnold, as 
well as an after-dinner talk by Miss Kingsbury, followed by an informal 
meeting with the girls in North Hall. Miss Diall also gave us a few helpful 
suggestions at an informal meeting after dinner in South Hall. 

The store in the basement of North Hall has been run very success- 
fully this year by Miss Goddard. 

A piano was rented for the dining-room this year, so that we now have 
a piano always ready for use. 

Our most important social events are four large parties a year: the 
Reception for new students, a Hallowe'en party, a Christmas party, and 
a Washington's Birthday celebration. All students living in colonies in 
Brookline are invited to these parties as well as those belonging to the main 
group of the dormitories. We are hoping as soon as it is possible to have 
all of these colonies become members of the Student Government Association- 

Ella Rose. 



101 




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Susan K. Brown, President Julia Stevens, Secretary 

Edith Salisbury, Vice-President Sara Le Valley, Treasurer 

The Young Women's Christian Association was organized at Simmons 
College in May, 1912, under the direction of Miss Katy Boyd George, 
the Boston Students' secretary. Officers were elected at that time, but 
regular meetings were not held until school opened in September. 

From the first, the time for holding the meetings has been every 
Tuesday at 4.30 p.m. The first and third Tuesdays of every month. Room 
114 of the college building has been used, and the meetings have consisted 
of a course of lectures by such men as Dean Hodges, of the Episcopal 
Theological School, of Cambridge. On the second and fourth Tuesdays 
regular devotional meetings have been held in Students' Room of the 
college building, with leaders from the faculty and student body. 

When a canvas of students was made in the fall, about two hundred 
of the girls became members, and it is hoped that by next year this number 
will not only be increased, but that the association will have a regular 
place in the life of the student body. 

Susan K. Brown. 



103 




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Simmon* College &tj)lettc Association 

Marion Donaldson, '13, President Mildred Libby, '15, Secretary 

Helen Anderson, '14, Vice-President Harriett Putnam, '15, Treasurer 

In our Freshman year, the nearest approach to an athletic associa- 
tion that Simmons offered was the gymnasium in the new wing. With 
the gymnasium, however, plans began to appear for an association to 
guard and guide the tennis tournament, basket ball games and whatever 
other activities might arise in the athletic line, until, in 1911, these plans 
matured and the Simmons Athletic Association was firmly established. 

The Association has made a sure advance, although it may have 
seemed to move forward slowly. Each year more girls come out for the 
different sports. We are looking forward now to our third annual out- 
door track meet. If the competitors for track honors, and the spectators 
continue to increase in number and in enthusiasm, Simmons will soon 
have to engage a larger field for the events of Track Day. 

Now is the time when we really need the support and co-operation of 
every girl in the college. Simmons has grown in loyalty and in college 
spirit since the S. A. A. was established, but more girls ought to be a part 
of this Association. If you are not already one of us, join now, for we want 
your support. 

Marion Donaldson. 



105 




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ftfje 1913 JWtcrocosim 



Cbitonal Poarb 

Editor-in-Chief, Elizabeth Walker, '13 
Business Manager, Jeannette B. Hinchliff, '13 



gtesoctate Cbitorsf 



Nelle B. Swanburg, '13 

{Art Editor) 

Emily E. Woodward, '13 

{Assistant Business Manager) 

Olive E. Diall, '13 

{Literary Editor) 

Edna A. Wells, '13 
{Photographs) 



Doris E. Wilber, '13 

{Grinds Editor) 

Gertrude Ford, '14 



Mary A. Pratt, '15 



Kathleen Keirstead, '16 



107 



<§ltt Club 

(Officers! 

Miss Mabel W. Daniels, Leader 
Elizabeth Walker, '13, Manager Edith Salisbury, '14, Secretary-Treasurer 

Edith Johnston, '13, Librarian 

Under the leadership of Miss Mabel W. Daniels, the Glee Club has this 
year risen to a degree of excellence, which places it on a level with any 
woman's college Glee Club in the country. The membership is limited, 
and there is at present a long waiting list of candidates. The Club gives 
two concerts annually, one soon after mid-years, and one during Com- 
mencement week. The program for Commencement, 1912, follows: 

Commencement Concert, June, 1912 

I. Creole Love Song ........ Smith 

Glee Club 

II. Banernfest . ....... Alfred Moffat 

Mandolin Club 

III. (a) My Mother Bids Me Bind My Hair .... Haydn 

(b) Nymphs and Shepherds ...... Purcell 

(c) Sing Heigho ........ Henschel 

Mrs. Ethel W. Ross 

IV. In Springtime — A Choral Cycle .... Mabel W. Daniels 

(a) The Awakening 

(b) Apple Blossoms 

(c) The West Wind and the May 

(d) Spring Heralds 

Glee Club 

Solos by Mrs. Ross and Miss Kennison, '15 

V. Collegians ...... Arranged by H. F. Odell 

Mandolin Club 

VI. In Fair Andalusia ....... Herbert Sherwood 

(By request) 

Solo by Miss Elizabeth Kennison 
VII. Chink of Gold 

Mandolin Club 
VIII. Grinds: "Simmons Girl" 

Music, E. M. Kellaway, '13 Words, E. Walker, '13 

IX. Alma Mater ....... Sarah Louise Arnold 

Mildred Libby, Accompanist 
109 



jUlanboltn Club 



At a meeting held in June, 1912, the Simmons College Mandolin Club 
elected Miss Estelle Freeman leader. On account of illness Miss Freeman 
did not return when college opened, and Miss Anita Q. Clark was elected 
to take her place. Miss Katherine Fall was chosen manager. Contrary 
to the custom of previous years, the membership of the club was not limited 
to girls who play mandolins or violins, but was thrown open to all who play 
stringed instruments. The club assisted at the Senior play, and a number 
of the girls played at the Christmas party of the Instructors' Club. 

First Mandolin: Anita M. Allen, Margaret E. Brann, Marion A. Kimball, 
Gertrude Hussey, Anita Q. Clark, Laura L. Doring, Gertrude Ford, 
Katherine Leonard. First Violin, Gladys Gordon, Mary E. Rogers. 

Second Mandolin: Gladys C. Abbott, Gertrude Brehm, Lucile W. Hill, 
Frances E. Keegan, Elsey W. Larkin, Marjorie Parmley. Second 
Violin, G. Marion Holland. 

Third Mandolin: Ellen S. Daniels, Katherine Fall, Emma Poore, 
Margaret L. Hogan. Third Violin, Elsie M. Howlett. 

Guitar: Lena C. Beecher, Beulah R. Staples. 
Banjo: Margaret E. Wylie. 
Piano: Alice C. Livingston. 



Choir 

Bessie Jost, '15, Manager Elizabeth Day, '13, Secretary-Treasurer 

The choir has this year been regularly organized with officers and a 
constitution. 

It consists of both choirs of forty voices, which sing on alternate 
chapel days, thus having a membership of eighty. The choir sings special 
anthems on Christmas, Easter, and Baccalaureate Sunday. When both 
choir and Glee Club sing together they are called the "Choral Society." 
All members of the Glee Club must also be members of the choir, but not 
all choir members can belong to the Glee Club. The choir has also a wait- 
ing list, and membership is limited. 

Ill 



Simmons; jllugtcal association 

(Officers! 

Clarissa Babcock, '13, President Charlotte Reid, '14, Secretary-Treasurer 

Under the new Council System in effect this year, the Glee Club, 
Mandolin Club, and choir have united to form one large body, which is 
known as the Simmons Musical Association. Its president sits with the 
Council and represents all the musical organizations at the Council meet- 
ings. 

The purpose of the formation of the Association was to simplify the 
affairs of the three organizations and to arrange later, perhaps, for a common 
treasury. 



Vtiytxi 



The custom of holding a short religious service every other Sunday 
evening in the dormitories was started in 1909, and has been maintained 
each succeeding year. This year the Vesper services have been held in 
North Hall, and have been in charge of Miss Margaret Niles, Miss Joy 
K. Mauck, and Miss Ellen H. Daniels. There is no doubt but that this 
is one of the precedents which has been wisely established and which will 
come to mean more and more to the girls and to the college life. 

SPEAKERS 

September 29 Dean Arnold 

October 13 Dr. Gifford 

October 27 Dr. Stiles 

November 10 Dr. Van Ness 

November 24 Mr. Hull 

December 15 President Lefavour 

January 11 Miss Morse 

112 




The final matches in a singles tournament were held at the dormitory 
courts on Saturday morning, October 12. There were thirty-nine entries 
representing the four regular classes and the College Graduates and Specials. 
The representatives of the different groups in the semi-finals were as follows: 
1913, E. Thurston; 1914, H. Anderson; 1915, O. Ruby; 1916, K. Tappan; 
College Graduates, E. Sibley; Specials, M. Smith. Miss Anderson defeated 
Miss Thurston 6-1, 6-4, and Miss Ruby won from Miss Tappan 7—5, 6-4. 
In the finals the matches were very close. Miss Anderson won with the 
score 7-5, 5-7, 6-3. 

The Special and College Graduate representatives played off for a 
new cup presented by the Athletic Association. Miss Sibley won, the score 
being 6-2, 4-6, 7-5. 

Miss Donaldson, President of the Athletic Association, presented the 
cups to the winners. After the tournament the Sophomores entertained 
the Seniors at luncheon in the Refectory. 

The judges were Dr. Mark, Dr. Underwood, Miss Diall, and Miss 
Le Vallev. 




115 




M. DONAIDSON M. GURDY A. PORTER 

C. Babcock 



E. Walker 



I. Weld 




H. Carleton L. Hardy G. Baker C. Ekstrand R. Ashley L. Brown 

H. Anderson G. Abbott L. Nisbet I. Bassett A. Bassett 




^assfeet Pall 



1914 still holds the basketball cup as a result of the final victory 
in 1911, because there were no final games played off in the spring of 1912, 
through default and on account of weather conditions. This year all 
match games are to be played off before Easter vacation, to avoid a repeti- 
tion of last year's trouble. 

VARSITY TEAM OF 1911-12 

L. B. Nissen, 1912, forward E. Whitney, 1912, guard 

H. M. Anderson, 1914, forward E. Walker, 1913, guard 

G. M. True, center 

VARSITY, 1912-13 

H. M. Anderson, 1914, forward E. Walker, 1913, guard 

Marjorie Yates, 1916, forward M. Titcomb, 1915, guard 

C. Ekstrand, 1914, center 

SUB-VARSITY, 1912-13 

C. G. Babcock, 1913, forward M. Donaldson, 1913, guard 

H. Putnam, 1915, forward G. Hussey, 1916, guard 

A. Porter, 1913, center 



1913 



C. G. Babcock, forward (captain) 
M. Gurdy, forward 
A. Porter, center 



E. Walker, guard (manager) 

M. Donaldson, guard 

I. Weed, guard 



H. Anderson, forward 
I. Bassett, forward 



1914 



C. Ekstrand, center 
117 



L. Nisbet, guard (captain) 
A. Bassett, guard (manager) 




G. Minott L. Mirick S. Orvis H. Williams M. Libby 

M. Smith M. Titcomb 

H. O'Brien H. Putnam A. Parkhurst E. Kennison 









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E. Little Margaret Yates G. Hussey L. Wright Marjorie Yates 



1915 



FIRST TEAM 

H. Putnam, forward (captain) 
A. Ray, forward (manager) 

H. Williams, center 



M. Titcomb, guard 
M. Smith, guard 



A. Parkhurst, forward 
H. O'Brien, forward 



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SECOND TEAM 

L. Mirick, center 

SUBS 



rvis 



E. Kennison, guard 
M. Libby, guard 



E. McDowell 



Marjorie Yates, forward 
L. Wright, forward 



1916 

FIRST TEAM 

Margaret Yates, guard (manager) 
G. Hussey, guard (captain) 
E. Little, center 



M. Wheeler, forward 
C. Lofstedt, forward 



SECOND TEAM 



E. Wood, center 

SUB 

M. Harrison 



E. Richardson, guard 
M. Whiting, guard 




119 





6 
8 









The second annual track meet at Simmons took place in the athletic 
field, Saturday morning, May 11, 1912. Much spirit was shown by all 
classes, but the Freshmen, were especially noticeable in their military band 
uniforms. 



J. Blanchard 
G. True 



C. G. Babcock 

M. Donaldson (manager) 
A. Porter 

A. Bassett (manager) 
L. Nisbet 

F. Davis 

D. Daval 
L. Hardy 

G. Abbott 

D. Wight 

G. Minott 

M. Libby (manager) 

L. Pinnock 



Cntrteg for ^racfe 

1912 

1913 



1914 



1915 



E. Whitney 

C. Aldrich (manager) 

L. Nissen 

D. Hughitt 
E. Walker 



I. Bassett 

F. Hughitt 

R. Klein 

E. Murphy 

M. Ostrander 

L. Raymond 

M. Tulis 

D. Frizell 

L. Randall 

E. Kennison 



The several events were run off in fine form, and resulted as follows: 



4 feet, 1 inch 



RUNNING HIGH JUMP 

Won by 

Tie for second place 

120 



J. Blanchard, '12 
( E. Walker,T3 
/ A. Bassett, '14 



12 feet, 4 inches 
11 feet, 11 inches 



7 feet, 6^ inches 
7 feet, 4 inches 
7 feet, 2 inches 



RUNNING BROAD JUMP 

Won by 

Tie for second place 

STANDING BROAD JUMP 

Won by 

Second 

Third 



BASKET BALL THROW 



Distance 66 ft. 11 inches 
62 feet 
56 feet, 43^ inches 

Time 7 seconds 

9 seconds 

10 seconds 

Distance 27 feet, 11 inches 
22 feet, 11 inches 
22 feet, 6 inches 



Won by 

Second 

Third 

50- YARD DASH 

Won by 

Second 

Third 

SHOT PUT 

Won by 

Second 

Third 



G. M. True, '12 
E. Walker, '13 
G. Minott, '15 

G. M. True, '12 

D. Hughitt, '13 

D. Wight, '15 

G. M. True, '12 

E Whitney, '12 

L. Nisbet, '14 



D. Hughitt, '13 
G. Minott, '15 
I. Bassett, '14 



H. M. True, '12 

E. Whitney, '12 

A. Porter, '13 



Second, 1912 

G. True 

E. Whitney 

C. Aldrich 

L. Nissen 



CLASS RELAY RACE 

Won by 1913 

C. Babcock 
E. Walker 
M. Donaldson 

D. Hughitt 

The meet was won by the class of 1912, with a score of thirty-one 
points; 1913 was second with eighteen points; and 1915 was third with 
six points. 

After the meet the Senior Class was presented, by Miss Arnold, with 
the track cup, and Miss Jessie Blanchard received the individual cup for 
the high jump, given for the holding of the high jump record for two years 
in succession. The individual cup was a gift from Miss Diall, and the 
track cup is presented by Miss Craig of the Secretarial Department, to 
be possessed each year by the winning class. Miss Glenna True, '12, had 
the largest individual score of twenty points, winning first place in four 
events. The shot put was a new event last year, but proved so successful 
that is has been incorporated as a part of the regular field day program. 

121 




Cfje grtubents' Eoom 



The Students' Room is for the use of the students, except on first and 
third Tuesdays after 4.20. Then we do not know what happens. ' 

The present and future students should be very grateful to the Alumna 
Association for furnishing and decorating this Students' Room. The 
Class of 1906 had its share, likewise, in giving a beautiful picture of Santa 
Barbara, and ladies of the corporation have donated several valuable 
pieces of furniture. 

It is almost a pleasure to study in such attractive, comfortable sur- 
roundings! The room lends itself for social purposes as well. The Monday 
teas are held here, and also class affairs and larger gatherings. 



122 



/.■ v .'W--.i..:\^iJ'i y.y. . • ; — • — rr-r-r 








Mentor $lap 




ALICE IN WONDERLAND 



Saturday, December 7, 1912 



CAST 



Alice, Faith Elliott 

The Queen of Hearts, 

Mabel Pettingill 
The Duchess, Esther Robbins 

The Cook, Margaret Niles 

Three Fairies: Margaret Moses, 

Gertrude Mandelstam, Estelle 

Stearns 



The March Hare, Marion Williams 
The King of Hearts, 

Mildred Starrett 
The Knave of Hearts, 

Elizabeth Walker 
The Executioner, Marion Donaldson 
The Gryphon, Blanche McDuff 

The Mock Turtle, Marion Buttrick 



124 




£PM§ 




Ladies of the Court 
The Dormouse, 



\ Amy Leonard 
( Mary Dutton 
Emily Woodward 
The Cheshire Cat, Susan Brown 
The Hatter, Edith Parsons 

The White Rabbit, Margaret Parker 



Gentlemen of Court 



Guards 



Pages 



\ Annie Sampson, 
| Annabel Porter 

\ Ida Adams 

( Esther Chapin 

\ Florence Goldsmith 

( Abby Parmenter 



Act I 

A Wood in Wonderland 



Act II 

The Mad Tea Party 



Act III 

Hall in Queen's Palace 
Overture, Mendelssohn Other Music Furnished by the 

Elizabeth Day Mandolin Club 

The Senior Class undertook as its class play, Mrs. Burton Harrison's 
■dramatization of Lewis Carroll's classic, "Alice in Wonderland," and gave 
two successful performances on December 7. This was one of the first 
efforts at dramatics in Simmons, and won the heartiest possible support 
•of the class and the college. We feel that the fun and enthusiasm which the 
play afforded was well worth the two weeks' determined work previous 
to the play, and merits the institution of Senior Dramatics as a custom. 

"Alice in Wonderland" is an escape from the world of fact into one 
where buns grow on bushes, and a grin without a cat is an ordinary oc- 
currence. 

You feel that you have wandered into a wild masquerade where every- 
body is on a mental holiday. You are certain that the Cheshire Cat is a 
lawyer on a lark: witness his mathematical, lawyer-like questions. You 
are convinced that the White Rabbit is a gentleman of leisure: witness 
his general air of good breeding, and his white gloves. Indeed, every one 
of these creatures is in holiday-mood for a good time. Alice, the ordinary 
•child, receives to her ordinary questions just the mad kind of answers that 
mad creatures would naturally give. The whole book is question and 
answer with the queer twists and turns that have delighted us from child- 
hood up. 



125 




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Audience and actors were in full sympathy and plunged hand-in-hand 
into the midst of the merry adventures. The cast were well chosen, and 
took their parts with zest and enthusiasm. Faith Elliott was an amiable 
and charming Alice, who looked and played her part to perfection. She had 
just enough of the naive to be engaging, and just enough of the childlike 
to be captivating. She was at her best in that ridiculous song, "Soup 
of the Evening," which she sang in a modest, school-girl manner that took 
the audience by storm. Our friend, the Hatter, was admirably portrayed 
by Edith Parsons, who showed that she had made a study of the role and 
thoroughly appreciated its humor. 

The dance of Blanche McDuff, as the Gryphon, and Marian Buttrick, 
as the Mock Turtle, was a gloriously grotesque thing of the most engaging 
awkwardness and astonishing spontaneity. The other parts were ably 
and enthusiastically filled, and the actors made the performance a constant 
charm and surprise from beginning to end. And the moral of that is: 
All of us were very sorry when the curtain finally fell on "Alice in Wonder- 
land." 

The committee in charge of the play was as follows: 

Lillie M. Peck, Chairman 
Jeanette Burke Helen McIntyre 

Olive Diall Elizabeth Thurston 




126 





W^mmmmmM 




?|aUotoe'en 




A shriek, a hiss, a wail, a groan, 

A hundred gather near; 
A howl, a snarl, a scream, a moan, 

A ghostly sight is here! 

Around the flaming cauldron bright 
They kneel and bow and dance, 

Upon the watching figures near 
Their lighted lanterns glance. 

But soon their ranks begin to close, 
They sing, they cheer, they shout; 

And all the college knows at once 
It's nineteen fifteen out. 





tkM m^0=*=& f r j 




127 




MICRDCHfiDS 



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JMIiMJ 




LIST OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO MICROCOSM BOX 
ACKNOWLEDGED BY EDITOR 



October 2. 
October 3-10. 



October 17-24. 
October 24-31. 



November 7. 
November 7-14. 
November 14-16. 

November 16-30. 

December 1-7. 
December 7-13. 

December 13-15. 
December 13-19. 



January 3. 
January 3-9. 
January 9-14. 
January 14-21. 

March 21. 



Nothing. 

Two jokes (one usable). 

One hairpin (bone, which I never wear). 

One gum wrapper (spearmint. I prefer Beeman's 

Pepsin). 
Nothing. (As good material as that already offered.) 
Three theater checks (Castle Square, second balcony). 
One joke (very poor). 
Two pieces of tin-foil. (If you save this, you can get 

five cents a pound for it.) 
Four pens. (Steel. Kindly remove surplus ink next 

time.) 
Two jokes. (Very good. THANK YOU.) 
Nothing. 

Considerable dirt. 

Two hairpins (wire; not quite long enough). 
Nothing. (Screws driven so tightly into box cover that 

it could not be removed.) 
Nothing. 
Five jokes. {All very good. On this day I gave ten 

cents to charity.) 
One piece of manuscript. (Verse. Very good indeed. 

No money for charity, however.) 

Nothing. 

Vacation 

Nothing. 
Nothing. 
Nothing. 
Nothing. (Went home for a week-end and was told 

that I looked crosseyed.) 
Did not look into the box. If there is anything there 

we cheerfully bequeath it to the 1914 Microcosm 

Board. 



"Stop! Look!! Listen!!! 
The Endowment Fund is coming. 

129 











"Classes are requested to rise when visitors enter the room. 



»» 





130 



mem 




From all Junior candidates trying out for literary work on the Micro- 
cosm for next year, the 1913 Board demanded sample editorials, among 
which were submitted the following: 

SUGGESTION TO I. M.'S 

A conveniently situated Prom agency would be a most popular in- 
stitution. This lucrative opening should appeal to I. M.'s who wish to 
engage in a beneficial enterprise. 

A NEW SHOCK-ABSORBER 

The Society for the Propogalists of more Painless Flunking has de- 
creed that the term marks shall be send to the parents and not, as formerly, 
be mercilessly issued to the students. Physicians agree that the old 
system was hard on the nerves of the students, and the present method of 
breaking it gently will be beneficial to the dispositions of all concerned. 

The Cosmopolitan stairs are to be furnished for those especially de- 
sirous of reducing, others are expected to use the elevators. 

GOOD MANNERS AND GOOD FORM 

In the Class Room 

Enter late and look highly amused if the class is started. 

Carry on side conversations, except when arguing with the instructor. 

Yawn as often as possible. 

Watch the clock if it is behind you. 
In the Lunch Room 

Use the elbow motion as much as possible. 

Aid your digestion by dawdling over your food, while you watch the 

other people looking for seats. 

Exercise the vocal chords, trying for a high soprano effect. 
In the Dormitory 

"Sh," everybody all the time. 

Wear the middy-blouse, sleeves rolled up, for dinner. 

Be as late to meals as you conveniently can. 

Never fail to talk shop at every opportunity. 
In Chapel 

Rush in directly ahead of the choir and take a senior's seat. 

Stare at the soloist, if there is one. 

Bustle out before the last hymn is over. 

Be sure to criticize the service at great length. 

131 




IMil 




SIM-MONS PRIM-ER 



IL-LUS-TRAT-ED 




This is a lock-er. What is a 
lock-er? A lock-er is a thing in-to 
which one puts one's hat, coat, furs, 
mon-ey, and jew-el-ry. Why doe's one 
put one's hat, coat, furs, mon-ey, and 
Jew-el-ry in-to a lock-er? To keep 
them safe. How does one keep them 
safe in a lock-er? One keeps them 
safe in a lock-er by shut-ting the door 
and pre-tend-ing not to have lost the 
key. Oh, what a use-ful thing a lock-er 
is! 



What is this thing? This is a jel-ly glass that 
Ma-ry's mother sent her. What is a jel-ly glass 
for? A jel-ly glass is to hold jel-ly, which is good 
to eat. Did Ma-ry eat the jel-ly? No, Ma-ry did 
not eat the jel-ly. Who ate the jel-ly? The girl 
a-cross the cor-ri-dor had a par-ty, and they ate the 
jel-ly. A par-ty is a cu-ri-ous thing. 




132 




poti 




SIM-MONS PRIM-ER 

I L— L U S— T RAT— E D 



The 1ut^o<L%k^Lfr- u/i s h e s 
-to see Miss ^^t^ZPCX^L 

at earliest opport itrui ty 



Office of Re 
1- 



SlV3uT 




t ,tV3- 



What is this that I see? This is an of-fice card. What is an of-fice 
card? An of-fice card is a note from the Reg-is-trar, asking for the pleas- 
ure of one's com-pa-ny. Why does the Reg-is-trar ask for the pleas-ure of 
one's com-pa-ny? Be-cause she feels great syra-pa-thy for those who have 
been too ill to go to class. What a kind la-dy the Reg-is-trar is! 



This is an ex-am-i-na-tion note book. 
What is an ex-am-i-na-tion note book ? An 
ex-am-i-na-tion note book is one in-to which 
one writes all that one can re-mem-ber a-bout 
one's course. Why does one write all that 
one can re-mem-ber a-bout one's course? In 
or-der that one may for-get one's course af-ter 
leav-ing ev-i-dence that one has tak-en it. 
How use-ful an ex-am-i-na-tion note book is. 



\ 






Lr 



133 




rmm 




Lilito^ 




A USE-FUL AL-PHA-BET 
For the Children 

A. a. 

Absent 

One must al-ways know why one was ab-sent. And so must the 
Reg-is-trar. 
B b. 

Bi-ol-o-gy 

This is some-thing which is kept a-way in Room 218, at the head of 

the stairs. It of-ten finds a way out all over the build-ing, how-ev-er. 

C. c. 
Con-di-tion 

A con-di-tion is a "state of be-ing" — up for an-oth-er ex-am-i-na-tion. 

D. d. 
Dump 

The dump is a place where ev-er-y-thing which is worn out goes. 
Sim-mons girls go here. 

E. e. 
Eth-ics 

Af-ter one has tak-en Eth-ics, one knows that it is wrong to pre-tend 
to be pay-ing at-ten-tion in Eth-ics class when one is re-al-ly a-sleep. 

F. f. 
Flunk 

The let-ter F stands for Flunk, but if mul-ti-plied by 5 may mean Fired. 

G. g. 
Gym. 

A course from which one gains no points, but which car-ries weight. 
H. h. 

The let-ter H means Cred-it. One does not re-ceive man-y cred-its 

in one's Fresh-man year, al-though one is cred-it-ed with some-thing 

for each ex-am-i-na-tion. 
I. i. 

Ink 

Ink is a use-ful ad-di-tion to a foun-tain pen. It is us-u-al-ly kept on 

one's gar-ments — un-less re-moved at once. 

J- j- 

Jones 

This is the name of a prac-ti-cal course in busi-ness train-ing which 
all Sen-ior Sec-re-ta-ri-al stu-dents must take at the end of the year. 
If a girl lives af-ter tak-ing Jones, there is noth-ing the mat-ter with 



134 




f"W^r^ ■ — : — ■-■ . . 




her "sys-tem," and she grad-u-ates. If she dies, there was some-thing 
vi-tal-ly wrong with it, and she would not have grad-u-at-ed any-way. 
K. k. 

Krush (Ger-man spell-ing) 

A krush is like a prom-is-so-ry note, and is not us-u-al-ly for a long 
ex-tent of time. There are two par-ties to a krush. The krush-ee 
is the one who re-ceives the can-dy and flow-ers, and the krush-or 
is the one who pays. The at-ten-tion paid is krush-ing. 



L. 1. 



M. 



N. 



O. 



P. 



Q. 



R. 



Low 

Some-thing stat-ed up-on an ex-am-i-na-tion book which pro-du-ces 
a like state of mind up-on re-ceipt of book by stu-dent. 
m. 

Marks 

A rec-ord kept in the of-fice and al-so sent to one's par-ents — called 
"marks," be-cause it marks the stu-dent's stand-ing. 
n. 

Noise 

Some-thing, which, when the Jun-ior Com-mit-tee hear it a-bout they 
al-ways let every one else hear a-bout. 
o. 

is the shape tak-en by the mouth of a stu-dent when an un-an- 
nounced test is tak-en. It stands for noth-ing, and is gen-er-al-ly 
a cor-rect stand-ard for the worth of the test pa-per. 

P- 
Pass 

The let-ter P stands for Pass. If a stu-dent gets P, she is passed — 

and passed safe-ly. 

q- 

Queer 

"Queer" is a word ap-plied to all in-struc-tors who do not give one 

good marks, be-cause they queer one in the of-fice re-cords. 

r. 

Rain 

Rain is a dis-turb-ance in the air which falls up-on Wed-nes-day and 

up-on us, but we cannot fall up-on rain as an ex-cuse for cut-ting 

Chap-el. 



Sen-ior 

A Sen-ior is a per-son in a pec-u-li-ar pos-i-tion (or who wish-es she 

were — at ev-en $9.50 per). 



135 




-mm'® 







T. t. 
Tea 

A tea is giv-en by the in-struc-tors ev-er-y Mon-day night. Hy-drox 

were once giv-en out, al-so, but they have now giv-en out, en-tire-ly. 
U. u. 

Use-ful 

When we are us-ing a note-book in lec-ture, we call it "use-ful." 

When there is no more room in it, we call it "used full," to show that 

its use-ful-ness is past. 
V. v. 

Ve-ry 

This is the de-gree of sor-row ex-pressed by in-struc-tors at giv-ing 

us Ls, and by the reg-is-trar at put-ting us on the card-list. 
W. w. 

Wea-ry 

This is a con-di-tion (we beg your par-don for men-tion-ing the word), 

which one ex-per-i-en-ces up-on rush-ing to the Rest Room. 
X. x. 

X 

Stands for an un-known thing, and may stand for the ans-wer to an 

ex-am-i-na-tion ques-tion. 
Y. y. 

Yel-low 

This is the Fresh-man class co-lor, but they are not to blame for it. 
Z. z. 

Zero 

Which means a ci-pher, which means noth-ing — un-less we get it 

for a test pa-per, in which case it means a great deal. 







faup^Jhf^. 
136 





imtm 




MODERN BARB^iSM 




When your massive brain gets a hatpin stab, 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
If you break all your glassware in Chemistry Lab., 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
When the cooking instructor examines your drawer, 
And finds "ONE CRUMB" with her sensitive paw, 
Don't exercise your indignant jaw — 

Be happy and dance and sing. 

If you lose your hat in a Fenway gale, 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
If your hour exam, comes back marked "fail," 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
When you climb from the lockers to fourth floor, and then 
You find you've forgotten your fountain pen, 
Oh, trip it merrily down again, 

Be happy and dance and sing. 

If the car breaks down and you come in late, 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
When the single threader won't stitch straight, 

Be happy and dance and sing; 
When you've had a gas oven broiler to clean, 
And receive a pretty white card from the Dean, 
Don't let it ruffle your stately mein, 

Be happy and dance and sing! 



137 



1 




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OUR NAMESAKE 





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m « 



THE SIMMONS WOCK 

'Twas Midyears and the Faculty 
Did Ec. and Physics in the Gym.; 

All German were the History 
And the Phil. Prob. 1 Hygiene. 

Beware the Chemistry, my son, 

The Cat. that Ed. the French that Ec. 

Beware the Documents and shun 
The Business Methods Sec. 

He took his Shorthand Cooking 3, 
Long time the English Lit. he sought, 

Then Spanish by the Com. Law tree, 
In Reference he thought. 

And as in Child Life thought he stood, 
The Chemistry, with eyes of flame, 

Came Ethics through the S. B. wood, 
And Commerce as it came. 

One, two! one, two! and through and through 
His Cooking 3 went snicker snack, 

He Ad. it dead, and with its head 
Went Cataloguing back. 

And hast thou slain the Chemistry? 

Come to my arms, my Thesis boy. 
Oh, Sewing B! Biology! 

He Chapel in his joy. 

'Twas Midyears and the Faculty 
Did Ec. and Physics in the Gym.; 

All German were the History 
And the Phil. Prob. 1 Hygiene. 





i#ili 




SHOTS FROM A. GUNN 
(Pearls from Biology II: Final Exam.) 

Pasteur is called the "Father of Medicine." 

Pasteur discovered vaccination for small-pox. 

Lister was the first to carry out vaccination. 

Koch discovered that vaccination would make one immune from small- 
pox. 

Semmelweiss discovered immunity by vaccination. 

Lister experimented with leprosy, its cause and spread. 

Walter Reed, the discoverer of cholera. 

Walter Reed discovered the test for typhoid fever. 

Walter Reed and Semmelweiss were two men who gave up their lives 
to prove that malaria was the result of mosquitoes. 

Semmelweiss did a great deal for women in overcoming the cause of 
infantile paralysis. 

Semmelweiss proved that many diseases are not hereditary. He also 
showed some facts about typhoid fever. 

Asepsis is the diseased condition of the body. 
Asepsis is unsterile or dirty. 

Asepsis is working with unsterilized instruments. 
Asepsis — bacteria. 

Ptomaines are small substances. . . . 
A living karacite. 

... a cow which has cow-pox put into his blood. 
... a certain kind of mosquito with slanting needles. 
Health inspectors who are not "grafts," like many of ours to-day, 
should be highered. 

The patient may have gotten the disease from someone else. 

"The Dean 
The Dean's secretary 
Miss Walker 
Variety is the Spice of Life." The Registrar 

Miss Robbins 
Dr. Eldridge 
Miss Elliott 
Wishes to see Miss at the earliest opportunity." 

140 



HiHiHl 





When feeling like this one is sure to pull a credit in 
shorthand and typewriting. 



This feeling helps one to write an interesting paper 
upon the Political Development of Europe between 927 
and 1451. 





It is well to feel like this after finishing examinations, 
so that one may start the new semester brilliantly. 



One should feel in this way in order to bully along to a 
successful conclusion a puzzling case in Commercial Law. 




Such a feeling is a great comfort when endeavoring to 
make a good impression on reviewing one's examination note- 
book in conference. 



THE TIE THAT BINDS 

Student. "Well, I — er — can't discuss that, because it enters into 
physiology, and I — er — I — " 

Instructor. "Yes, yes; that's all right. / don't know anything about 
physiology either." 

IT DID 

Instructor. "Now this is essentially a Woman's Problem. It may 
seem funny to you when I announce the subject: 'The Homeless Man.' 

Somehow or other we can't feel heavenly in Economics 3, although 
we know there is religion in the course, for we are taught that banknotes 
should be in "convenient denominations," and that one of their requisites 
is "confidence in redemption." 



141 





HOW A FRESHMAN LOVED HER GYM. 

Farmer Jones met Farmer Brown, 
They were both on their way to town; 
"Say," said Jones, "what do you know? 
My gal, Betty, ain't half so slow. 

"You know she's gone to Simmons College, 
Seeking for scientific knowledge; 
And Brown, would you believe it true? 
She's fell in love; now what to do? 

"She's writ her mother and me a letter, 
And said she liked him better and better 
Than any one she'd met afore, 
Tho' wife and me favored Sam McGore. 

"Now of course we're willin' she'd make her choice, 
But if it was Sam we'd both rejoice, 
For never was there a better feller, 
And many a time I've tried to tell her. 

"But Betty seems to think this one 

Is quite the best, and full of fun. 

I'll read what she said in her very last letter, 

And then you will understand it better. 

" 'Dear pa, I like the place still more 
Than when I wrote to you before; 
But Gym. I like the best of all, 
Gym. doesn't let a moment loll. 

" 'Such hours of fun as we do spend, 
We dance and fence and yell, 'Defend!' 
I can't deny, oh dearest pa, 
That I love Gym. now do tell ma.' 

"Now, Brown," said Jones, "what would you do 
If your gal writ that letter to you? 
I don't know nothin' about this Gym, 
But what she's said 's in favor of him." 

"Wal," said Brown, "I'll tell you, Jones, 
I don't want to be a 'meddly-bones,' 
But from her letter here's what I'd say, 
She's sure in love — let her choose her way." 

142 



\ 




Reminiscences of the Fenway 



\ „i«,w«~ -"'s*y I J<— V i S h k/ 





"The New I-yisTrocJ 



or 



WHE*f Yoi/ FEEL UkE "ODTTIVS U|»' 



L 



frAftVAfcP, 



CAf=E y 




When shall we three meet again?" 
"Taffy, the Laird, and Little Billee." 



THE C-IRL VJiTH MEHTIFHATf W viewed Of H«- 





ORDINARY MORTALS 

WHO CoOtDvr (JET A 
CERTIFICATE TO S/U'e 
TKE/R iJUKi 



143 






MMS^ mMMM 



SAMPLE SHORTHAND TRANSCRIPTS FROM ACTUAL NOTES 

No. 1 

The farmer has been through with the protection as against the com- 
petition of similar products merited from true adequate, as well as honor 
markets. Its proposition assumes that our productions are ignorance 
and histology. It is not it. From smokes individual you great stuffers 
of agriculture from Number! What farmer have so in our markets? 
Grain, white, or its home and foreign country are protectors as well re- 
membered and with the world. Their claim of production for the home 
stomachs, which is some (elevator) and a virtue in the trucks of pro- 
tection fate. What the farmer, and as well as he has been for years, and 
is now, the confusion to pay taxes off left! They used to tell the tariff 
that they will. So psychology, by the Wilson bill, that one into fact, 
influenced cost and wonderful basket action for four. To do that, claims 
benefit, since a high protection tariff, and in the midst of the most. The 
wonderful prosperity that have a pesky world argument has been proved 
to be facts. Papers are only with cans of fools and bankruptcy. Again, 
I see, it is not it. (Wield apples and elevator.) 

No. 2 

The joys of a vacation decade, preparation for it, the atonement of 
deficient senses, and the belling of a courter is quite as difficult a problem 
as the bill of a house. Fate forever sits down with pencil and pauper. 
We export information, and cancel a planting and worrying career, and 
deliver a life problem scientifically, as they would toil with the problem of 
delivering a hose, taking the advice of an archdeacon to operate them. 
Unknown people do not allow drifted unity, but some loon of a workman 
buys chance proximity or unformed selection to the high per cent then 
inefficient and which surprised all monied employers in their work. Force 
to the cost it entails in employment and expense, waste of training a low- 
grade surface air, duly bareheaded to the haphazard way in which inane 
men and women drift. In the wise joys of a vacation, there are three boys 
and educators. The more light one can bring to appear on the problem, 
the more bitter it will be for the coolness and strength of the concussions. 
Right at the end, the prominent valve of the result is buttoned. 

Instructor (apologizing for calling a girl by an incorrect name). "You 
will pardon me, but I find it will take a long time for me to get used to your 
faces." 

Angry voice in the rear. "What's the matter with our faces ! " 

144 



PRACTICAL PROBLEMS 

1. Given: a white card from the office. Find the "earliest oppor- 
tunity." 

2. A girl can walk f of a mile to college in 8 minutes, but it takes 
3 times as long to walk the same distance from college. At what rate can 
she walk across the dump? 

3. A father gave his daughter #60 to last from January until spring 
vacation. On February 3 there was $ .03 of the money still remaining. 
State fully the nature of the father's remarks. 

4. At what time between 11.20 and 12.25 do the hands of a clock 
appear to cease moving? 

5. Knowing that each girl called up for five-weeks' marks possesses 
a certain density, estimate roughly her specific gravity when informed of 
her F's. 

6. Given: a vacant period in the rest room. Find a vacant cot. 

Half a point, half a point, 

Half a point wanted! 
Onward to their degree 

Ride the one hundred. 
"Forward, the Senior class! 
Charge for the jobs!" he said; 
Onward to their degree 

Ride the one hundred. 



i" 



"Forward, the Senior Class 
Is there a lack of pass? 

Not though the girls all know 
Some nearly floundered. 

Theirs not to murmur "Punk!" 

Theirs not to fall ker-plunk! 

Theirs but to pass or flunk! 
Noble one hundred! 



Excited Freshman (appearing at door of Room 213). "Where's Dr. 
Mark? I can't see him anywhere. Why isn't he here?" 

Upper Classman (somewhat scornfully). : 'Well, why should he be 
here?" 

Freshman. : 'Why, it says on the Bulletin Board, you know, 'Marks 
in 213.'" 

145 








~*m: 



— ••-■■ - . -■ -•■ •■i/ib-'-'^Q 





$ — "® 



FRESH MM Ni&ltl/HflRE 



We had a little lunch last night, 

There was not much to eat; 
And every girl felt duty bound 

To leave her plate quite neat. 
No time was wasted getting rid 

Of tea and coffee strong, 
Shrimp wiggle, olives, fudge, and cake, 

Of pickles, loud and long; 
Of maple sugar, real "hot dogs," 

And salmon, nicely creamed, 
Apples, jelly, cookies, nuts — 

And when I slept, I dreamed. 

I dreamed I went with bows and frills 

To join the cooking class, 
Where Dr. Kin-sb-ry smiled, and gave 

My first attempt a "pass." 
Then into Business Methods, I 

With greatest haste did walk, 
And "Quick Despatch, the Minute Saved, 

Was Dr. Br-ck-tt's talk. 



146 



fe ■■ Mi' 




pm\m 




Soon Dr. D-w-ing came to give 

A little spelling quiz, 
And Thaddeus lectured to us, on 

"The Life that Really Is." 
Then Dr. El-r-dge taught the way 

In which to featherstitch, — 
We took our notes in German, 

Italian, French, and sich. 
MacLachlan testified upon 

"The way to help the needy," 
But by that time I'd grown, I fear, 

To feel a trifle seedy. 
But Dr. T-ler came along, 

And jovially did shout, 
"Just join my Gym. class, I will make 

You well and strong and stout!" 
That ended all my classes up, 

I hated to be through, 
And when I reached the B. Board, I 

Was feeling rather blue, 
But there I found a note that said, 

"Go home and take a rest, 
A month must be the shortest time, 

Six weeks — or eight — the best." 
I dashed the teardrops from my eyes, 

And quickly tore the note, 
For Woods was waiting at the door 

To hand me hat and coat. 
But what I heard outside the door 

My gloomy thoughts dispelled, 
For "Votes for Women! Votes for Women!" 

Mr. R-be yelled. 
Just as I paused to say "Good-by," 

I gave an awful scream, 
And then in bed, I found, alas, 

'Twas all an idle dream. 



ist Student. "What do you take in French?" 
2d Student. "I take Comfort in French prose." 
(We hope so.) 



147 




How dear to his heart is the shelf in his locker 
His jam and his crackers, his comb, and all that; 
His mirror, his new book, his proof sheets, his great 

coat, 
And e'en the fat pickles he keeps near his hat. 

The big, fat green pickles, the nice sour pickles, 
The pickles he keeps in a cute little jar; 
They told us he ate them, and we were dumb-founded, 
But now we believe — since we know where they are. 





Ho Hoaa 



"We shall meet but we shall miss him, 
There will be one vacant chair."' 









148 



THE FRESHA4AN MOVES ONE TO PITY 

I got into a trolley car, — ■ 

My daily morning stunt, — 
And I was greeted with the words, 

"Fares, please. Say, MOVE up front!" 

I rushed at college, down the hall 

To leave a book for Thad. 
I knew I'd have to walk four flights 

If he had gone. — He had. 

I went to cram some history 

Lest I be called upon. 
The library was chock block fuil, — 

I had to journey on. 

From there I tried the hall settee, 
And laughed some with a friend 

Until a JUNIOR came along 
And said the thing must end. 

Then wearily I seized my books 

And sat upon the stair; 
A Senior said, "Get up; it does 

Not look well to sit there." 

Quite tired out, I climbed the stairs, 

Despairing at my lot. 
And sought the Rest Room — last resort, — 

There was no vacant cot. 

I knew that Student's room was full, 

I had to wander round, 
I went on tiptoe through the halls — 

I dared not make a sound. 



But now at last I've found a place 
Where I can be a Queen; 

I sit and study at mv ease, — 
I wait to see the Dean. 

149 







m-mm 




HANDY BOOK FOR UNDERGRADS. 



"how to tell the instructors from the students" 



A. In the Classroom : 



1. 

2. 

3. 



The instructors sit on the platform, while the students are grouped 

in the many chairs facing them. 
The instructors have their books open. The students do not. 
The instructors generally do most of the talking aloud. That of 

the students among themselves is not allowed. 
4. The students generally pass out at the end of the period before 

the instructors, even when the instructors pass out at the same 

time. 

B. In the Corridor: 

1. The Juniors do not request the instructors to maintain quiet, 

but demand it of the students. 

2. Only the students wear gymnasium suits in the corridors. 

C. In the Lunch-room : 

1. The instructors sit at reserved tables; the students wherever there 

is a square inch of unoccupied space. 

2. The instructors do not eat as much or as fast as the students do. 

D. In General : 

1. The instructors do not dance in the gymnasium during the noon 

hour. 

2. No instructors wear middy blouses to class. 



HA! HA! 



Heard in Chem. I: 

" Chlorine is a greenish-yellow gas, and is very irritable."* 

The chemistry class was discussing the kindling point of fluids. The 
question about kerosene had just been settled when some one asked, "What 
is the kindling point of water ?"f 

Explanation of Joke: 
* The correct word is irritating." 
■f Water has no kindling point. 

150 




§mim 





CARDS - DlOG v wkiTt 

if von jer A Hide untuou 

lr a»" S«T A whlft -0114 3»U 



MID ^E/4K5 ARE COMIA/S-. 



THE LEGEND OF EVIL 

This is the sorrowful story 
Told when a Freshman fails, 

And the students walk together 
Telling each other tales. 

"The Freshmen came from a High School, 

Foolish children were they, 
They thought that here at the College 

There was nothing to do but play. 

"The Freshmen skipped from their classes, 
The Freshmen went out to tea, 

The Freshmen omitted Chapel 
And also their history. 

"Then came the awful instructors, 

Nothing of play they knew, 
Only — they caught the Freshmen 

And flunked a lot of them too! 

"Now, we speak of the Freshmen 

With sighs and a silent tear, 
We know not where they have vanished, 

Only — they are not here." 

This is the horrible story 

Told when a Freshman fails, 
And the students walk together 
Telling each other tales. 



151 




mmm 




INTERESTING FACTS INSTRUCTORS HAVE GLEANED 

FROM STUDENTS 

1. A surgeon can sterilize his hands by boiling. 

2. After the temperature in a room reaches 105°, the only relief is 
evaporation. 

3. The subject matter in Poole's Index is arranged chronologically 
by the first word. 

4. Women never overeat; men do so constantly, and are, as a result, 
bulky and stupid. 

INTERESTING FACTS STUDENTS HAVE GLEANED FROM 

INSTRUCTORS 

1. Singing is something which birds and other animals do. 

2. A range is exactly the same as a stove only a little different. 

3. Mrs. Nelle H. Hardrics was born December 13, . It was her 

birthday. 

4. The constituents of the air are argon, helon, zeon, and so on. 

CHAPEL ETIQUETTE 

When you hear Alma Mater, all join in on the chorus. 

Don't smile when the Seniors get out of step. They do it only for 
variation. 

When reading magazines, it is courteous to refrain from turning the 
leaves loudly. 

If you do not understand what the speaker is saying, at least cultivate 
an intelligent expression. (If possible.) 

A little child, frightened at the big crowd on election night, asked a 
group of Simmons girls, returning from the theater, "What's the matter, — 
has there been a fire?" 

(We think so. Taft was put out, anyhow.) 

If my last name were Acitate, what would my first name be? 
Answer. Ethyl. 

152 





lE5fcjg3^'"- •■• • ••■•••• ■'T&j£g£ — - • • • • •■•••• -*m v g/» ^P 






Ml 



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» BUJ.J I 








153 




mmm 




"iHilestonts" 

We here offer an announcement of the play, "Milestones," which has 
been presented every June for the last six years, and is to appear again 
in a short three months. The pamphlet account here reproduced, contains 
the last scene in the four-act play, the scenes of each separate act of which 
are set for certain points in the period of life represented at that stage, 
known respectively as, First Five Weeks, Second Five Weeks, Mid-Years, 



etc., to Finals. 



FROM THE PRESS 






A play which for the last decade has created a sensation in the thinking 
world because of its remarkable boldness and entire novelty. A striking 
contrast in its industrial intricacies to the staged routine of the academic 
circle and the homely household tasks. It passes in rapid survey the 
conquering ideals of the last decade, and gives in the closing scene here 
quoted the picture of educational felicity arrived at after the progressive 
clashes with the generous audacities of Fresh Sophs, the blaze ennui of 
Pop Juns, and the assurance of Safe Seniors. 

The whole four-act play has been called a satire, and it has been called 
a comedy, in some instances it has been thought to verge upon tragedy; 
it is no one exclusively, for it clings too closely to life. The urgency of 
youth to possess what it has claimed, the ferment and struggle for liberation 
and self-control, the inevitable tendency for the Freshmen of to-day to 
become the Senior of to-morrow — these are the thoughts which give 
vitality. 

A collaboration which has been pronounced unique as a piece of un- 
precedented innovation, it is scoring one of the most conspicuous successes 
of the present century in Educational United States. 

(Signed) Studens. 



(Note. — Apologies are offered for all appropriations. Arnold and 
Edward, we humbly thank, and Mr. Doran, too.) 



154 




MM 




Bebtcatton 

To 

JOHN FUNDUS 

Who having brought the means together 
instructed for collaboration with 
man 
and who when he had been 
obeyed returned to judge 
of the handiwork in 
Studens 
Who 
in return for 
his kindly thought 
presents to him the 
Red Rose 

. °f 

Loving Loyalty. 



CHARACTERS IN THE PLAY 



John Fundus 
Mrs. Mater Fundus 
John Fundus (alive) 
Gertrude Kindly 

Sam Conservatus 
Rose Conservatus 
Ned Lordling 



Emily Fundus 



Nancy Conservatus 



Lord Lordling, Knighted Sir High-brow 



Richard 



A ghost 

Known as Alma 

A promoter 

Governess for Alma 

Always present 

Overruled by John (alive) 

A gentle aristocrat 

Used merely as an enticer to garish 
state. 

Questioning offspring of John and 
Rose. 

Merely in name. 

Opener of Sam's eyes and keeper of 
his sanitarium. 

A young example of what man is 
coming to if Muriel keeps on. 

Offspring of the Conservatuses, but 
has made his mark. A silent lad 
but rules Muriel as necessity de- 
mands, — while Muriel keeps on. 



155 




mmm 




The Honourable Muriel Lordling (Studens) 

Aristocratic 



Thompsons, Websters — Footmen 



New Era Vocational 
Production. Offspring of Ques- 
tioning Emily and Ned Lordling. 
Scornful sister to young Knight 
Highbrow. 

She no longer questions. 

Therefore the assembly about the 
altar. 

Never present in the room except 
in last tableau. 

Ever present in the harassed souls 
concerned in her achievements. 

Votaries of the second row. 
Having brains, they seeth. 
Having eyes, they see. 
Having ears, they hear. 
Having tongues, they are dumb. 
Having fatigue, they sleep. 
On rare occasions they murmur 
in their sleep and sometimes cry 
Amen, or even produce a glim in 
further speech- 



Time, 1913 



Place — Our World 



THE MILESTONE 

OR 

WHERE SHE IS NOW AT 

The last scene in Her 
Four Act Comedy 
including 
A brief resume of Her wild career 

as 
discussed before the avenging Tribunal 

(Note : — Right and wrong are from the point of view of the other fellow.) 
The Scene represents the driving-room of an edifice in Fensington Lore. The 
building is comparatively new just now — all the decorations, pictures and furni- 
ture are of the mid- Victorious period. On the front, five high windows look out on 
Fensington Dumps. At the rear, two narrow doors lead to the back-driving-rooms, 
various locations of which are approached through dark corridors and immaculate 



156 





mimo msmm i 




stairways which show signs of wear, due to the traffic resulting from the constant 
consideration of problems in human elevation by means of Laws of Survival of the 
Fittest. In the center a large altar, around which the members of the Family are 
drawn in puckered worries. 

During the entire scene the two doors are closed; the curtains are not drawn and 
the windows are kept judiciously busy, because of the instant need for fresh supplies 
of nourishing ozone. The lamps are lighted to shed rays upon the darkness about 
the altar. 

From time to time carefully prepared cartoons of Human Probabilities, statis- 
tically digested and graphically presented in sweeping physical curves are hung upon 
the walls. These offer refreshment to the smouldering votaries of the second row, 
whose lamps are constantly in danger of being altogether extinguished in the heavy 
atmosphere of the sacrificial altar. 

The normal decorations and furnishings preserve the air of young aloofness 
according to Alumnae & Company's well-known design. 

It is about half-past nine in the morning of the eleventh of June, 1913. 

(Mrs. Mater Fundus, fondly called Alma, a woman of over ten seasons' Re- 
cords, is sitting on the grand settle at one end of the room; she has about her various 
possibilities of industry intended for the Vocational Rose's improvement; but 
progress has been temporarily interrupted because of the Mater's intense interest 
in the discussion of the fate of Rose's grandchild, who has become an Honourable 
Self-governing Body. Near her in a wicker armchair sits John Fundus, the elder 
whose generosity made it possible for the Mater to be an Alma. He is an old man 
dressed in the fashion of a forgotten era. He is constantly murmuring "trades," 
and "self-support," and now and then vainly endeavours to communicate to the 
living-dead Family that They are all off.) 

John F. (The ghost): This is no place for me, dear Mater; home was never 
like this, and it was for home I did it. However, I must be patient and try to 
stretch my comprehension of this strange new world. John was ever wise; I'll 
listen to him kindly. 

Mrs. Mater F.: Yea, dear John, they are all our children by birth or adoption, 
even the Honourable grandchild whom I do dearly love in spite of all the quaking 
gives my poor old heart. Old only in years, however, for my spirit is ever young and 
tries to fit its protection to the ever-changing dangers of each generation. But 
they do all look most fearsome grave, I trust no harm is to be done the child for her 
folly. 

John F. (alive) : The Family will please wake to order. We must come to the 
final business of the hour. We will hear from the Committee on Curves with regard 
to Muriel's present probabilities. 

Sam C. (For the Committee): Mr. Promoter, the committee has found that 
the Honourable person under consideration has in her career out-curved all Human 

157 





W I ERmmEMWW' ill 




Probabilities and unless the Family puts forth most strenuous efforts there is only 
one certainty in view — that the C's will undoubtedly become F's. 

John F. (ghost): Listen, dear Mater, what do they mean by C's and F's? 

Mrs. Mater F.: Seas of trouble, dear John, and Futures condemned. You do 
not recognize it in this form and have never realized that Future. Let us hold 
thought for our Honourable Child. 

John F. (alive) : Please explain by an axiomatic equation. 

Sam C: Why, Mr. Promoter, if x = Disregard of advice and y = Ignorance 
in subsidiary courses, it naturally follows (to my mind) that C's must become F's. 

Gertrude K.: But, Mr. Promoter, when Muriel found herself deficient in 
subsidiary material she petitioned most earnestly to be drilled and examined as often 
as possible, particularly upon the words and rules upon which she already had been 
examined. This seems to me to show a most praise-worthy spirit on the part of the 
Honourable Child. 

Sam C: Mr. Promoter, nevertheless, I feel, that other things being equal, the 
C's should become F's. 

A Webster: Mr. Promoter, she has three times permitted the water (I should 
say, in deference to the theoretical department, the H2O) to disappear from the 
vegetables at inauspicious moments and has not yet presented a completely whole 
loaf. 

A. Thompson: Mr. Promoter, she constantly refuses to wear her Bibs. Sav- 
ing your presence, Sir. 

Nancy C: I see no reason for permitting such negligence to meet with any 
undue leniency on the part of the administration. Indeed, I know it to be a fact 
that she has by no means yet rounded out her work on the High Cost of Living, and 
as for the Minimum Wage — she knows absolutely nothing about what a small 
salary she should expect, for her first undertaking, at least. 

Gertrude K.: However, we must admit that she showed a most wise sense of 
the fitness of candidates in her recent record at the Polls. 

Richard C.: Right, as usual — and I can add information in her favor, also. 
Not once during her four year course has she permitted her breakage of chemistry 
glassware to exceed, to a disparaging degree, the amount deposited by her parents 
in the Family coffers. 

Sam C.: But considering the most noteworthy fact that countless others have 
not even encroached upon a similar fee held in their names in these same vaults, it 
seems to me that this action on Muriel's part is not particularly worthy of any 
especial praise, or perhaps even of comment. 

Gertrude K.: If we are working upon a basis of comparison, which it would 
most deeply grieve me to suspect we were doing, Muriel, in this respect only, per- 
haps, would stand in thevery pleasant, and, to some, enviable place of number three 
on a graded scale of 0-5. But, since Muriel is an individual, we must consider her 

158 









IMEMBSMMM 



case as an individual case, and eliminate all reports concerning what Marjorie, 
Helen, or Josephine may or may not have done under similar circumstances. 

Sam C: But, if Marjorie's, Helen's or Josephine's records bear directly upon 
Muriel's case, and may, perhaps, from their very analogy, bring us to a . 

Gertrude K.: No exigency can arise in which one student's records are suffi- 
cient for a decision on another's. Conditions are constantly changing, and at 
different periods so must our views become more liberal, to accord with the general 
view of the new progressive world. 

Richard: Let us endeavor to expound a few very tangible and creditable 
facts in Muriel's record, which will very evidently be of great value in deciding our 
course of action in her case. 

Firstly: she has a remarkable faculty for the appearance of attentiveness, and, 
at times, of most engrossed and intense interest. 

John F. (The ghost) : Dear Mater, what are we come to, when they count 
deceit not as a vice, but laud it as a virtue? 

Mrs. Mater F.: Hush, John, we know not the ways of to-day. Let us rejoice 
that our grandchild can brave her times without serious detriment to hereditary 
ideals which we have given her. 

Richard (continues) : Secondly, observe her at the weekly exercises held 
most fittingly in yonder church — there is no doubt but that she sings well and 
loudly. Can you not see that she strives always to give of the best that she can? 
The cooking department holds records which show most plainly that she has seven. 
times essayed to produce a perfect Parker House Roll. Is such willingness of 
spirit to go unnoticed? When informed of her failures, she has very cheerfully 
prepared at once for another attempt. Is such sensibility and earnest effort to be 
passed over as undeserving of comment? 

Gertrude K.: You are right, Richard Conservatus, and we must consider 
Muriel's fundamental and innate qualities which would be of value to an employer, 
before we pass judgment upon her office records alone. 

Sam. C: The C's should become F's. I maintain still that the case remains as 
it was at the beginning and that the C's should become F's. 

Richard C.: I protest, I am sure that ■. 

Gertrude K.: Since we have, then, practically decided that Muriel possesses 
native cleverness, and that her personal qualities would be of substantial benefit 
to any employer, let us complete our session by allowing the C's to remain C's and 
permit her to receive the Honored Certificate and depart in peace. 

John F. (The ghost): Listen, Mater. What do they say? It is beyond 
my understanding, and I cannot bring myself to approve of the records of Muriel. 

Mrs. Mater F.: Dear John, she is your grandchild and they are judging her 
for her real worth as a woman in the world. It is the way in which all judging 
should be done — have I not always said it? 

159 








John F.: Ah, that's because you're pleasant. I've said it before and I say it 
again. 

The women of to-day aren't what women used to be. They're hard, they've 
none of the old charm. Unsexed — ■ that's what they are — unsexed. (Muriel 
enters quickly from the hall in a rich blue and gold cloak.) She pauses smiling, 
then hurries delicately across to her grandfather and embraces him; releases him, 
shyly takes a rose from her bosom, drops it into his hand, turns and gives her Mater 
a smile, whispering — "I am going out but not away. I shall always come back. 
They're waiting for me," and hurries out again. 

John F. (ghost) (looking at the flower) : We live and learn. 

Mater: Yes, John. 

The organ is heard playing a triumphal march and the Family and Votaries 
arise to form the procession. 




(The Excelsior of Simmons) 



What it means to 

1. The Household Ec. Girl: 

but she will be a 

2. The Secretarial Girl: 

but she will have a 

3. The Library Girl: 

but she will be a 

4. Science Girl: 

but she will get a 

5. Social Worker: 

but she will have her 

6. To the World : 

and 

7. To Father: 



Stupid Bacteria 
Sometime Bride 

Sacrificed Beauty 
Satisfied Boss 

Saturday Busy 
Social Blessing 

Scornful Brothers 
Situation a-Broad 

Systematic Blundering 
Sympathies Broadened 

Somewhat Brilliant 
Several Bills 



160 




HWW 



Instructor. "Describe the appearance of an earthworm. What does it 
look to you most like?" 

Student (without a moment's hesitation). "An accordion." 



Instructor. "Why did you dash out of the room in the midst of my 
lecture?" 

Trembling Freshman. "My fountain pen ran out, and I ran after it." 



If the girls didn't pay their chemistry fees would Mr. Dunham? 



F stands for Freshmen, the pets of the college; 

R for their racket, you all will acknowledge. 

E for the "eats" which brighten their days, 

S for their saucy and cute little ways. 

H is the honor they hope to attain, 

M for the men they all have in their train. 

E for the errors to which they're all blind, 

N for the nursery just left behind. 



Why are the Juniors not paid for keeping quiet in the corridors? 
Answer. They won't accept hush money. 
What is the best filling for Park Street cake? 
Answer. Subway jam. 



Alas, how deceitful are 

Appearances; 
This is not a poem; we 

Only wrote 
It this way to fool you. 



161 




wmwMA 




i 



A SUGGESTION TO THE FACULTY 

We respectfully urge that Chapel be held at the Christian Science 
Church, so we can get credit for absence treatment. 



Expurgator (as material for the Microcosm is brought to the English 
office for him to pass judgment upon). "Well, what have you here for 
me to look over?" 

Delegate for Mi-crocosm. "Only a few small jokes." 

(General smile from the English Department.) 



HALLOWE'EN 



Sudden drop in temperature. Office records read: 

0° C and also 

0° F. 
Students unprepared for such Simmons weather during the first five 
weeks. 



She was a Freshman in the Glee Club, so she was allowed to stay 
for Commencement. She was at the mercy of a Faculty and trying hard 
to make conversation and an impression. The latter was certain when she 
exclaimed, "I think it's the grandest thing! This is the first class that 
ever graduated full!" 




t 





163 




THE MICROCOSM 
BOARD WISHES 
TO THANK 



THE 
PICTURE 

MAN 



FOR THE FINE 
WORK HE HAS 
DONE. 



WE ARE YOUNG, MOTHER SIMMONS 

"We are young, Mother Simmons," 
The Freshman said; 

"And we work all the day and the night, 
And yet you incessantly give us more work, 

Do you think, in our youth, it is right?" 

"I have tried," Mother Simmons 
Replied to her child, 

"To instill common sense in your brain, 
And though I am sometimes convinced you have none, 

Yet I try it again and again." 

"We are young," said the child, 
"And the physics too hard, 

For any poor Freshman to do it, 
Yet you finish us up with the German and French, 

Pray, how can we ever get through it?" 

Then quoth Mother Simmons: 
"Just plan out your work; 

That is one vital thing you must learn. 
If you don't, and yet manage somehow to get through, 

Pray, WHAT do you think you could earn?" 

"But we're young," said the child, 
"And we didn't suppose 

That our days would be crammed full as this, 
We had thought that college would be heaps of fun, 

But it's far from our notion of bliss." 

"I have heard all you said," 
Mother Simmons replied; 

"And I know that perhaps it is true, 
But yet, all my daughters who leave me, 'make good'; 

And that is the best I can do." 



165 



PRIZE BABIES 



OF 



SENIOR BABY SHOW 





1st Prize 



2nd Prize 



Names withheld by parents request 




THE END 




LOU think the Ads. fhemse ves are "jokes 
Ar\<k. 'never .sfo-p To read tl^e-m t|-jvouoh; 

<r ,n l L.y° V ^ & 3Lyxce . "ft e ™ oer "^V* year 
You'll |i-nd surprise jokes \e~re £ot vou. 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



/ 



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MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 




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THE SEVEN WONDERS OF SIMMONS 

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"but here's what I did with Jell-O. Could any cook make anything finer than that, and 
won't that hit the spot?" 

Of course no cook could make anything finer. The "beauty of it" is that women 
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doesn't have to be cooked. The young housekeeper who must 
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The name Jel,l,-0 is on every package in big red letters. If it isn't there, it isn't Jell-O. 




MICR' COSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Wax Brothers 

FLORISTS 

143 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 

Opposite Temple Place Subway Station 

Choice 

Roses, Violets and Orchids 

Constantly on hand 

Mail and Telephone Orders 
Promptly Filled 



Telephones, Oxford 574 and 22167 



Telephone, 3605 Back Bay 

B. F. Macy 

Fomerly of F. A. Walker & Co. 

Kitchen Funishings and 
Fireplace Fittings 

410 Boylston Street (near Berkeley Street) 
BOSTON 



The girls who take long Chemistry, 
Though they endure great agony, 
Yet in the end will help set right 
The impure foods, and bring to light 
The fact that " grape-nuts " made of cork, 
That Libby's hams could never walk, 
That "Postum's" really peanut shell, 
And many other things as well. 



I've scores of friends who say to 

me, 
With smiles of scorn or shouts of 

glee, 
"Of course you work for a degree? 
But what degree? Well, I can 

guess, 
The plain degree of M-R-S." 
Now don't believe it for a minute, 
For really there is nothing in it. 

The Old Corner Book Store 

Incorporated 

Standard and New Books, Medical and 

Scientific Books, Prayer Books and 

Hymnals 

Subscriptions received for all English and 
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27 and 29 Bromfield Street, Boston 
Massachusetts: Telephone 7069 or 7070 Main 



ESTABLISHED 1841 

A. Hathaway Co. 

Incorporated 

Carpenters 

and 

Builders 

82 Charles Street 

Telephone, Haymarket 1279 

Boston 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



A. E. MARTELL CO. 

Designers and Manufacturers of 

LOOSE LEAF 

AND 

MANIFOLD BOOKS 

159 DEVONSHIRE STREET 
BOSTON, MASS. 



F. H. HOUGHTON 

Jflorisit 

4 Park Street 
Boston 

'Phone, Haymarket 2311 and 2312 



Heard in English 3. "At first it was a general battle, but in 
the end there were just the two leaders left, and they fought a duet." 

You can fool some of your instructors all the time, and you 
can fool all of your instructors some of the time, but you can't 
fool all your instructors all of the time. 

It is a -wise instructor who can recognize his own notes in a 
student's note book. 

The Lord loveth the way of the plugger, but the way of the 
bluffer shall perish. 



a* 



■a 



Cobb, Bates & Yerxa Co. 



are thoroughly equipped to supply 
Colleges, Schools, Institutions and 
all large users of the best quality 
of groceries from their wholesale 
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(OPPOSITE SOUTH STATION) 



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VI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



R. H. STEARNS £r CO. 



FOR several years 
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RESIDENTIAL APPOINTMENTS 

MISS ILLDE A. WITHERELL 

shampooing, electro scalp massage 
facial treatments 

The Sheffield 

394 Massachusetts Ave. 

Boston 

TEL. TREMONT 21939 

The sewing girls will shine, also, 
When out into the world they go 
To teach the heathen how to sew. 
Yet "charity begins at home;" 
To find a victim they need roam 
Only so far as city slums, 
Where every little foreigner comes; 
And drill them till they are half dead 
To tell the needle from the thread. 



ARTHUR D. JONES 



Mason and Contractor 



Prompt Attention Given to 
Jobbing of all Kinds. 



76 KINGSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



Telephones: 2676 and Oxford 331 
Home, 1165-4 Bellevue 



Albert P. Smith Telephone Richmond 1647 

Smith Brothers 

Butter, Cheese and Eggs 

2 and 4 Faneuil Hall Market 
and Basement No. 3 



BOSTON 



MASS 



Sole Receivers of 
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VII 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



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Factory, 444 P. A., off Hereford Street 

Telephone, Back Bay 3899-M 



Call and let us convince you 
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most reasonable prices. 

A. AXELSON 

babies' bailor 

4 FRANCIS STREET 

OPPOSITE BRIGHAM S HOSPITAL 



ROXBURY, 



MASS. 



Household Management Instructor. If some one gave you a 
greasy platter to clean, what would you do? 
Tired Student. I'd throw it at 'em! 

"Just as the grand master was about to drink his sherbet, 
Saladin himself calmly cut his head from his body and com- 
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. . . "Even for the Saladin this is a master stroke!" 

^IlllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllW 



WebsterS New International 

DICTIONARY-TheMerriamWebster ! 



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5! 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



i?KENNEfaM5ffERBURy(blilPANY, 




We wonder if it was a Household Economics student who, 
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course they wouldn't need a rolling pin." 

Chase Express Company 

Telephone, Brookline 36 




D.B.UPDIKE 

Cbe e^errpmount Press 

232 SUMMER ST. 
BOSTON 

PRINTER OF THE SIMMONS COLLEGE 
BULLETIN, fif THE PUBLICATIONS OF 
OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF LEARNING 

fife, fife, fife. 

Officers and Students of Simmons College 

are invited to -visit the Press, opposite the 

South Stat on, Boston 



Is there, for honest failure, then, 
That hangs her head, and a' 
that? 
The coward girl, we pass her by, 

We dare to flunk for a' that! 
For a' that, and a' that, 

Our work won't count, and a' 
that; 
The rank is but the guinea stamp, 
There's knowledge there, for 
a' that. 



I think she passed her mid-years, 

Yes, I'm sure of it, and yet — 

I may be wrong — her locker 

bears 

A sign which reads, "TO 

LET." 



IX 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Cox Sons & Vining 

72 MADISON AVE. 
NEW YORK 



Caps 

and 

Gowns 




Hoods 
for 
all 
Degrees 



Pulpit and Judicial Robes 
Choir Vestments 



Si 



mmons 



So 



uvenirs 



Pennants (Old English) 75 cents 

V lettering / 

Banners (Old English^ ^1.50 

V lettering / ^ 

Simmons Seal Pins in $1.00 

Gold and Silver and upwards 

Simmons Writing Tab- 
lets with printed seal, 30 cents 

Die stamped paper in 
quire boxes with en- 
velopes 

40, 50 and 60 cents per box 

Pillows made to special order 
A. D. Maclachlan 

502 Boylston Street, Boston 




Crockery, China and 
Glassware 



T , »., r, . . The newest shapes and decorations of TABLE- 

1 he Athena Pattern. WARE and ORNAMENTAL PIECES con- 

French China. stantly arriving from the best Potteries and Glass 

Factories of England, France, Germany, Austria, China, Japan and America. Patrons will 

find extensive exhibits in 

Dinner Set Department Art Pottery Rooms 

Glassware Department Lamp Department 

Stock Pattern Department Hotel and Club Department 

In our KITCHENWARE DEPARTMENT is an extensive variety of Souffle Dishes, 
Egg Poachers, Cafeteriers, Casseroles, Cocottes, Shirred Egg Dishes, etc., in French Porcelain 
and other wares. Also plain and decorated wares for kitchen and pantry. The Blue Willow 
pattern in full assortment. Yellow Mixing Bowls and Nappies, Blanc-mange Moulds, Blue 
Edge Pie Plates, etc. 

STUDENTS' REQUISITES 

Lamps, Tea Sets, Chocolate Pots and Sets, Candlesticks, Welsh Rarebit Plates, Tea 
Infusers, Jardinieres, Window Boxes, Ferneries, Bureau Sets, Bon Bon Dishes, Plates of all 
kinds, odd Pitchers in endless variety, as well as Bric-a-Brac suitable for complimentary and 
wedding gifts. Glassware of all grades. Inspection invited. 

Jones, McDuffee & St rat ton Co. 

Crockery, China and Glass Merchants 
33 Franklin, COr. Hawley Street, Near Washington and Summer Streets 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



Beatey & Baron 


DIEGES £r CLUST 


Shampooing 50 and 75 Cents 

Scalp Treatment 50 Cents 

Facial Massage Manicuring 


"If we made it, it's right" 


50 Cents 25 Cents 




7 Temple Place Room 67 
Telephone Oxford 2645-J 


Class Pins Medals 
Fraternity Pins Stationery 



At the close of each five weeks the heads of the various de- 
partments will send invitation cards to their receptions. 

CRITICISM OF A LONG THEME 

. . . "You should have begun with the last sentence and 
omitted all that precedes." 

To cut or not to cut — that is the question! 



"CHOISA" 
CEYLON TEA 




Packed in Parchment-lined 
One pound and half-pound Canisters 

We invite comparison with other 
Teas of the same or higher price. 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

BOSTON . * BROOKLINE 




College Girls ! 



We are pleased to announce 
that we have enlarged our quarters 
this season, and are, therefore, pre- 
pared to show you a larger assort- 
ment of original hats at the same 
moderate -prices. 

Your early inspection is invited. 

Fannette Millinery Parlors 

7 Temple Place Boston 



XI 



MICROCOSM ADVERTISEMENTS 



FOUNDED WITH THE COLLEGE— 1902 

Isn't this room terribly warm? 

Now a week from to-day we will have a little test. 

I don't see anything funny! 

But you shouldn't have forgotten. 

I'm sorry I had to give you an L. Your ability isn't at fault — - 

I really can't understand 

All reserved books are to be returned the morning after taking. 

No wet umbrellas or outside wraps 

All things being equal 

In the last analysis 

Exactly. 

The class is dismissed. 



ENGLISH AS OUR INSTRUCTORS SPEAK HER 

Now, if all these small settlements could only unite in union — 
But things like that don't — er — be. 



When going to and from 

SIMMONS COLLEGE 

Send your baggage by the 

ARMSTRONG 

TRANSFER CO. 



We give the best and most reliable service of any 
express company in Boston, and make more trips 
daily than any other company. 

We have unequalled facilities for tracing baggage 
that has been delayed or gone astray. 

Provided you purchase your railroad tickets in 
advance, we can check your baggage from residence 
to destination, if you desire. 

Brookline Office: 1352 Beacon Street 
Telephone, BROOKLINE 3020 

Principal Office: 271 Albany Street, Boston 
Telephone, TREMONT 55 

Also offices in all Railroad Stations in Boston 



C. F. Hovey £&f Co. 



Coats Suits Gowns 

Skirts and Evening Wraps 

For Misses and Women 



This Department Offers at All Times 
The Latest Styles of Wearing Apparel 
In Both Imported 
and American Made Goods 



PRACTICAL AND DRESSY 

MODELS 
AT MODERATE PRICES 



XII 




Whither away my Simmons maid, 

I am going to Hatch's sir she sayed 

And why " to there " do you choose to go 

Because she said " It's a lovely show " 

And there is not a shop in all creation 

Where the goods and prices are such a temptation. 

The things I see are things I can buy 
For they suit my purse as well as my eye \ 
So to Hatch's she wended her blithesome way 
As we trust that you will next shopping day. 




Our dainty hand embroidered Mandarin Ccats for Negligee and Opera wear, 
and exclusive line of waists made from our own imported goods, combined with 
Chinese embroideries are enough to delight any one who might be the receiver 
of any one of these things. 

May we have the pleasure of showing you these goods? 



v.s* 



(WALTER TCH&TCtf ffCO. 

Tcemout And (ftUst Steals 

(Nq seff rugs 1&o and we taflwe necer veen 



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